„The Speaker is seen, but not heard and the President is neither seen nor heard. He would very much would a President who is neither seen nor heard, but who decides. I would like to do something silently.“

—  Neelam Sanjiva Reddy, His statement on assuming office of President in: Dr. Janak Raj Jai "Presidents of India, 1950-2003", P.140
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„Painting is poetry which is seen and not heard, and poetry is a painting which is heard but not seen.“

—  Leonardo Da Vinci Italian Renaissance polymath 1452 - 1519
Context: Painting is poetry which is seen and not heard, and poetry is a painting which is heard but not seen. These two arts, you may call them both either poetry or painting, have here interchanged the senses by which they penetrate to the intellect. A Treatise on Painting (1651); "The Paragone"; compiled by Francesco Melzi prior to 1542, first published as Trattato della pittura by Raffaelo du Fresne (1651)

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„Who has seen the wind?
Neither you nor I:
But when the trees bow down their heads
The wind is passing by.“

—  Christina Rossetti English poet 1830 - 1894
Who Has Seen the Wind? http://www.repeatafterus.com/title.php?i=1191, st. 2 (1872).

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„3306. Maidens should be seen, and not heard.“

—  Thomas Fuller (writer) British physician, preacher, and intellectual 1654 - 1734

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Lewis H. Lapham photo

„The rich, like well brought up children, are meant to be seen, not heard.“

—  Lewis H. Lapham American journalist 1935
Chapter 6, The Precarious Eden, p. 151

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„I have seen all I care to see and heard rather more.“

—  Jack Vance American mystery and speculative fiction writer 1916 - 2013
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William T. Sherman photo

„It is only those who have neither fired a shot nor heard the shrieks and groans of the wounded who cry aloud for blood, more vengeance, more desolation. War is hell.“

—  William T. Sherman American General, businessman, educator, and author. 1820 - 1891
Context: I confess without shame that I am tired & sick of war. Its glory is all moonshine. Even success, the most brilliant is over dead and mangled bodies […] It is only those who have not heard a shot, nor heard the shrills & groans of the wounded & lacerated (friend or foe) that cry aloud for more blood & more vengeance, more desolation & so help me God as a man & soldier I will not strike a foe who stands unarmed & submissive before me but will say ‘Go sin no more. Letter to James E. Yeatman of St. Louis, Vice-President of the Western Sanitary Commission (21 May 1865). As quoted on p. 358, and footnoted on p. 562, in Sherman: A Soldier's Passion For Order https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/080938762X (2007), John F. Marszalek, Southern Illinois University Press, Chapter 15 ('Fame Tarnished') Variant text: I confess, without shame, that I am sick and tired of fighting — its glory is all moonshine; even success the most brilliant is over dead and mangled bodies, with the anguish and lamentations of distant families, appealing to me for sons, husbands, and fathers […] it is only those who have never heard a shot, never heard the shriek and groans of the wounded and lacerated […] that cry aloud for more blood, more vengeance, more desolation. […] I declare before God, as a man and a soldier, I will not strike a foe who stands unarmed and submissive before me, but would rather say—‘Go, and sin no more.’ As quoted in Sherman: Merchant of Terror, Advocate of Peace https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Special:BookSources/1455611891 (1992), Charles Edmund Vetter, Pelican Publishing, p. 289 See the Discussion Page for more extensive sourcing information.

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„The words are very distinctly formed; but by the bodily ear they are not heard. They are, however, much more clearly understood than they would be if they were heard by the ear.“

—  Teresa of Ávila Roman Catholic saint 1515 - 1582
Context: It will be as well, I think, to explain these locutions of God, and to describe what the soul feels when it receives them, in order that you, my father, may understand the matter; for ever since that time of which I am speaking, when our Lord granted me that grace, it has been an ordinary occurrence until now, as will appear by what I have yet to say. The words are very distinctly formed; but by the bodily ear they are not heard. They are, however, much more clearly understood than they would be if they were heard by the ear. It is impossible not to understand them, whatever resistance we may offer. When we wish not to hear anything in this world, we can stop our ears, or give attention to something else: so that, even if we do hear, at least we can refuse to understand. In this locution of God addressed to the soul there is no escape, for in spite of ourselves we must listen; and the understanding must apply itself so thoroughly to the comprehension of that which God wills we should hear, that it is nothing to the purpose whether we will it or not; for it is His will, Who can do all things. Ch. XXV. "Divine Locutions. Discussions on That Subject" ¶ 1 & 2

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