„The dead are free from Fortune; Mother Earth has room for all her children, and he who lacks an urn has the sky to cover him.“

—  Lucano, livro Pharsalia

Book VII, line 818 (tr. J. D. Duff).
Pharsalia
Original: (la) Libera fortunae mors est; capit omnia tellus
quae genuit; caelo tegitur qui non habet urnam.

Obtido da Wikiquote. Última atualização 3 de Junho de 2021. História
Lucano photo
Lucano9
39 - 65

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„Death takes the mean man with the proud;
The fatal urn has room for all.“

—  Horace, livro Odes

Book III, ode i, line 14 (trans. John Conington)
Odes (c. 23 BC and 13 BC)
Original: (la) Aequa lege Necessitas
Sortitur insignes et imos;
Omne capax movet urna nomen.

„Death takes the mean man with the proud;
The fatal urn has room for all.“

—  John Conington British classical scholar 1825 - 1869

Book III, ode i
Translations, The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace (1863)

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„He has not acquired a fortune; the fortune has acquired him.“

—  Diogenes Laërtius biographer of ancient Greek philosophers 180 - 240

Bion, 50.
The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers (c. 200 A.D.), Book 4: The Academy

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„You caused this. Mother is dead from having too many children.“

—  Margaret Sanger American birth control activist, educator and nurse 1879 - 1966

To her father at her mother's funeral.
Quoted in [2010-05-09, The Pill turns 50, Nidhi Bhushan, DNA, http://www.dnaindia.com/lifestyle/report_the-pill-turns-50_1380774]

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„The world crucifies them every day,
But only in little ways.
The sky is not shaken,
And the earth travails not with her dead.“

—  Khalil Gibran, livro Jesus, The Son of Man

A Man From Lebanon: Nineteen Centuries Afterward
Jesus, The Son of Man (1928)
Contexto: Here and there, betwixt the cradle and the coffin, I meet your silent brothers,
The free men, unshackled,
Sons of your mother earth and space.
They are like the birds of the sky,
And like the lilies of the field.
They live your life and think your thoughts,
And they echo your song.
But they are empty-handed,
And they are not crucified with the great crucifixion,
And therein is their pain.
The world crucifies them every day,
But only in little ways.
The sky is not shaken,
And the earth travails not with her dead.

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„He is dead, and my hatred has died with him.“

—  Jean Paul Sartre, The Flies

Electra, before the dead Aegistheus, Act 2
The Flies (1943)

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„He has a right to argue for them as eloquently as he can, in season and out of season. He has a right to teach them to his children. But certainly he has no right to be protected against the free criticism of those who do not hold them. . . . They are free to shoot back. But they can't disarm their enemy.“

—  H.L. Mencken American journalist and writer 1880 - 1956

"Aftermath" in the Baltimore Evening Sun http://www.positiveatheism.org/hist/menck05.htm#SCOPESD (14 September 1925)
1920s
Contexto: Once more, alas, I find myself unable to follow the best Liberal thought. What the World's contention amounts to, at bottom, is simply the doctrine that a man engaged in combat with superstition should be very polite to superstition. This, I fear, is nonsense. The way to deal with superstition is not to be polite to it, but to tackle it with all arms, and so rout it, cripple it, and make it forever infamous and ridiculous. Is it, perchance, cherished by persons who should know better? Then their folly should be brought out into the light of day, and exhibited there in all its hideousness until they flee from it, hiding their heads in shame.
True enough, even a superstitious man has certain inalienable rights. He has a right to harbor and indulge his imbecilities as long as he pleases, provided only he does not try to inflict them upon other men by force. He has a right to argue for them as eloquently as he can, in season and out of season. He has a right to teach them to his children. But certainly he has no right to be protected against the free criticism of those who do not hold them.... They are free to shoot back. But they can't disarm their enemy.
The meaning of religious freedom, I fear, is sometimes greatly misapprehended. It is taken to be a sort of immunity, not merely from governmental control but also from public opinion. A dunderhead gets himself a long-tailed coat, rises behind the sacred desk, and emits such bilge as would gag a Hottentot. Is it to pass unchallenged? If so, then what we have is not religious freedom at all, but the most intolerable and outrageous variety of religious despotism. Any fool, once he is admitted to holy orders, becomes infallible. Any half-wit, by the simple device of ascribing his delusions to revelation, takes on an authority that is denied to all the rest of us.... What should be a civilized man's attitude toward such superstitions? It seems to me that the only attitude possible to him is one of contempt. If he admits that they have any intellectual dignity whatever, he admits that he himself has none. If he pretends to a respect for those who believe in them, he pretends falsely, and sinks almost to their level. When he is challenged he must answer honestly, regardless of tender feelings.

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