„You can build a throne with bayonets, but it's difficult to sit on it.“

—  Boris Yeltsin, Televised speech (4 October 1993), as quoted in A Democracy of Despots (1995) by Donald Murray. p. 8 Variant translations: You can make a throne of bayonets, but you can't sit on it for long. You can build a throne with bayonets, but you can't sit on it for long.
Boris Yeltsin photo
Boris Yeltsin6
1931 - 2007
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„Whence are you certain that ye Ancient of Days is Christ? Does Christ anywhere sit upon ye Throne?“

—  Isaac Newton British physicist and mathematician and founder of modern classical physics 1643 - 1727
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„Ctrl+Alt+Del is the Rubbish King, sitting proudly on a throne of rotting meat.“

—  Ben Croshaw English video game journalist 1983
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„No matter how high or great the throne,
What sits on it is the same as your own.“

—  Yip Harburg American song lyricist 1896 - 1981
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„On the highest throne in the world, we still sit only on our own bottom.“

—  Michel De Montaigne, The Complete Essays
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„If you don't have ammunition, you have bayonets! FIX BAYONETS! GET DOWN!“

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„Labor is the truest emblem of God, the Architect and Eternal Maker; noble Labor, which is yet to be the King of this Earth, and sit on the highest Throne.“

—  Albert Pike Confederate States Army general and Freemason 1809 - 1891
Context: Whatsoever of morality and intelligence; what of patience, perseverance, faithfulness, of method, insight, ingenuity, energy; in a word, whatsoever of Strength a man has in him, will lie written in the Work he does. To work is to try himself against Nature and her unerring, everlasting laws: and they will return true verdict as to him. The noblest Epic is a mighty Empire slowly built together, a mighty series of heroic deeds, a mighty conquest over chaos. Deeds are greater than words. They have a life, mute, but undeniable; and grow. They people the vacuity of Time, and make it green and worthy. Labor is the truest emblem of God, the Architect and Eternal Maker; noble Labor, which is yet to be the King of this Earth, and sit on the highest Throne. Men without duties to do, are like trees planted on precipices; from the roots of which all the earth has crumbled. Nature owns no man who is not also a Martyr. She scorns the man who sits screened from all work, from want, danger, hardship, the victory over which is work; and has all his work and battling done by other men; and yet there are men who pride themselves that they and theirs have done no work time out of mind. So neither have the swine. Ch. XXII : Knight of the Royal Axe, or Prince of Libanus, p. 341

„The day of the sun is like the day of a king. It is a promenade in the morning, a sitting on the throne at noon, a pageant in the evening.“

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„You see these dictators on their pedestals, surrounded by the bayonets of their soldiers and the truncheons of their police.“

—  Winston S. Churchill Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1874 - 1965
Context: People say we ought not to allow ourselves to be drawn into a theoretical antagonism between Nazidom and democracy; but the antagonism is here now. It is this very conflict of spiritual and moral ideas which gives the free countries a great part of their strength. You see these dictators on their pedestals, surrounded by the bayonets of their soldiers and the truncheons of their police. On all sides they are guarded by masses of armed men, cannons, aeroplanes, fortifications, and the like — they boast and vaunt themselves before the world, yet in their hearts there is unspoken fear. They are afraid of words and thoughts; words spoken abroad, thoughts stirring at home — all the more powerful because forbidden — terrify them. A little mouse of thought appears in the room, and even the mightiest potentates are thrown into panic. They make frantic efforts to bar our thoughts and words; they are afraid of the workings of the human mind. Cannons, airplanes, they can manufacture in large quantities; but how are they to quell the natural promptings of human nature, which after all these centuries of trial and progress has inherited a whole armoury of potent and indestructible knowledge? Winston Churchill, in "The Defence of Freedom and Peace (The Lights are Going Out)", radio broadcast to the United States and to London (16 October 1938).

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