„It is not true that equality is a law of nature. nature has made nothing equal, her sovereign law is subordination and dependence.“

Il est faux que l’égalité soit une loi de la nature. La nature n’a rien fait d’égal; la loi souveraine est la subordination et la dépendance.
Fonte: Reflections and Maxims (1746), p. 180.

Original

Il est faux que l'égalité soit une loi de la nature. La nature n'a rien fait d'égal; sa loi souveraine est la subordination et la dépendance.

Réflexions et maximes
Variante: Il est faux que l’égalité soit une loi de la nature. La nature n’a rien fait d’égal; la loi souveraine est la subordination et la dépendance.

Última atualização 4 de Junho de 2020. História

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