„If the art of eloquence is the art of persuading, there is no other eloquence but that of saying the truth, only the truth, the naked truth. Words, since it is a necessity of our infirm nature to clothe thought, will be the more powerful the more they are suited to their aim, that is the more naked they will leave the truth, which resides in thought.“

Se l'arte dell'eloquenza è l'arte di persuadere, non vi è altra eloquenza che quella di dire sempre il vero, il solo vero, il nudo vero. Le parole, onde è necessità di nostra inferma natura di rivestire il pensiero, saranno tanto più potenti, quanto più atte al fine, cioè più nudo lasceranno il vero, che è nel pensiero.
Platone in Italia

Original

Se l'arte dell'eloquenza è l'arte di persuadere, non vi è altra eloquenza che quella di dire sempre il vero, il solo vero, il nudo vero. Le parole, onde è necessità di nostra inferma natura di rivestire il pensiero, saranno tanto più potenti, quanto più atte al fine, cioè più nudo lasceranno il vero, che è nel pensiero.

da Platone in Italia

Obtido da Wikiquote. Última atualização 5 de Junho de 2021. História
Vincenzo Cuoco photo
Vincenzo Cuoco4
1770 - 1823

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Eugène Delacroix photo

„They say that truth is naked. I cannot admit this for any but abstract truths; in the arts, all truths are produced by methods which show the hand of the artist.“

—  Eugène Delacroix French painter 1798 - 1863

12 October 1859 (p. 388)
1831 - 1863, Delacroix' 'Journal' (1847 – 1863)

François de La Rochefoucauld photo

„The passions are the only advocates which always persuade. They are a natural art, the rules of which are infallible; and the simplest man with passion will be more persuasive than the most eloquent without.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld, livro Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims

Les passions sont les seuls orateurs qui persuadent toujours. Elles sont comme un art de la nature dont les règles sont infaillibles; et l'homme le plus simple qui a de la passion persuade mieux que le plus éloquent qui n'en a point.
Variant translation: The passions are the only orators who always persuade. They are like a natural art, of which the rules are unfailing; and the simplest man who has passion will be more persuasive than the most eloquent man who has none.
Maxim 8.
Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (1665–1678)

Karl Popper photo

„Our aim as scientists is objective truth; more truth, more interesting truth, more intelligible truth. We cannot reasonably aim at certainty.“

—  Karl Popper Austrian-British philosopher of science 1902 - 1994

In Search of a Better World (1984)
Contexto: Our aim as scientists is objective truth; more truth, more interesting truth, more intelligible truth. We cannot reasonably aim at certainty. Once we realize that human knowledge is fallible, we realize also that we can never be completely certain that we have not made a mistake.

Thomas Carlyle photo

„Can there be a more horrible object in existence than an eloquent man not speaking the truth?“

—  Thomas Carlyle Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher 1795 - 1881

Address as Lord Rector of Edinburgh University, (1866), reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
Attributed

Thomas Fuller (writer) photo

„1200. Craft must have Clothes; but Truth loves to go naked.“

—  Thomas Fuller (writer) British physician, preacher, and intellectual 1654 - 1734

Introductio ad prudentiam: Part II (1727), Gnomologia (1732)

Henri-Frédéric Amiel photo

„Truth is the secret of eloquence and of virtue, the basis of moral authority; it is the highest summit of art and of life.“

—  Henri-Frédéric Amiel Swiss philosopher and poet 1821 - 1881

Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919), Journal

Simone Weil photo

„Above all our thought should be empty, waiting, not seeking anything, but ready to receive in its naked truth the object that is to penetrate it.“

—  Simone Weil French philosopher, Christian mystic, and social activist 1909 - 1943

Waiting on God (1950), Reflections on the Right Use of School Studies with a View to the Love of God
Contexto: Above all our thought should be empty, waiting, not seeking anything, but ready to receive in its naked truth the object that is to penetrate it.
All wrong translations, all absurdities in geometry problems, all clumsiness of style, and all faulty connection of ideas in compositions and essays, all such things are due to the fact that thought has seized upon some idea too hastily, and being thus prematurely blocked, is not open to the truth.

George Gordon Byron photo

„No words suffice the secret soul to show,
For truth denies all eloquence to woe.“

—  George Gordon Byron English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement 1788 - 1824

Canto III, stanza 22.
The Corsair (1814)

Thomas Fuller (writer) photo

„5305. Truth loves to go naked.“

—  Thomas Fuller (writer) British physician, preacher, and intellectual 1654 - 1734

Introductio ad prudentiam: Part II (1727), Gnomologia (1732)

Gerhard Richter photo

„Since there is no such thing as absolute rightness and truth, we always pursue the artificial, leading, human truth. We judge and make a truth that excludes other truths. Art plays a formative part in this manufacture of truth.“

—  Gerhard Richter German visual artist, born 1932 1932

Notes, 1962; as cited on collected quotes on the website of Gerhard Richter: 'on Art' https://www.gerhard-richter.com/en/quotes/art-1
1960's

„Shepherd: Men are more eloquent than women made.
Nymph: But women are more powerful to persuade.“

—  Thomas Randolph (poet) English poet and dramatist 1605 - 1635

Amyntas; or, The Impossible Dowry (1630; pub. 1638), Prologue

Quintilian photo

„But I fancy that I hear some (for there will never be wanting men who would rather be eloquent than good) saying "Why then is there so much art devoted to eloquence? Why have you given precepts on rhetorical coloring and the defense of difficult causes, and some even on the acknowledgment of guilt, unless, at times, the force and ingenuity of eloquence overpowers even truth itself? For a good man advocates only good causes, and truth itself supports them sufficiently without the aid of learning."“

—  Quintilian ancient Roman rhetor 35 - 96

Book XII, Chapter I, 33; translation by Rev. John Selby Watson
De Institutione Oratoria (c. 95 AD)
Original: (la) Videor mihi audire quosdam (neque enim deerunt umquam qui diserti esse quam boni malint) illa dicentis: "Quid ergo tantum est artis in eloquentia? cur tu de coloribus et difficilium causarum defensione, nonnihil etiam de confessione locutus es, nisi aliquando vis ac facultas dicendi expugnat ipsam veritatem? Bonus enim vir non agit nisi bonas causas, eas porro etiam sine doctrina satis per se tuetur veritas ipsa."

Eckhart Tolle photo
Julian (emperor) photo

„Nature loves to hide her secrets, and she does not suffer the hidden truth about the essential nature of the gods to be flung in naked words to the ears of the profane…“

—  Julian (emperor) Roman Emperor, philosopher and writer 331 - 363

"Oration VII": "To the Cynic Heracleios", as quoted in The Works of the Emperor Julian (1923) by Wilmer Cave France Wright, p. 105; also in Hidden Wisdom: Esoteric Traditions and the Roots of Christian Mysticism (2005) by Gedaliahu A. G. Stroumsa, p. 25
General sources

Thomas Carlyle photo

„Silence is more eloquent than words.“

—  Thomas Carlyle Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher 1795 - 1881

Wallace Stevens photo
Vladimir Lenin photo

„Human thought by its nature is capable of giving, and does give, absolute truth, which is compounded of a sum-total of relative truths.“

—  Vladimir Lenin Russian politician, led the October Revolution 1870 - 1924

Materialism and Empirio-Criticism (1908)

Blaise Pascal photo

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