„Paint upon a palette, delighting our eyes with soul-satisfying pictures, a treasure of well set jewels a sympathy with growing things, fashioned into a dream of beauty, a place of perfect rest and refreshment of mind and body. This sense of beauty is a gift of God.“

—  Gertrude Jekyll, Colour in the Garden
Gertrude Jekyll photo
Gertrude Jekyll5
garden designer, artist 1843 - 1932
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Joseph Addison photo

„Beauty soon grows familiar to the lover,
Fades in his eye, and palls upon the sense.“

—  Joseph Addison politician, writer and playwright 1672 - 1719
Cato, A Tragedy (1713), Act I, scene iv.

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„Well fare she, well! As perfect beauty fares;
And those high places, that are beauty's home.“

—  Lionel Johnson English poet 1867 - 1902
Context: p>Ill times may be; she hath no thought of time: She reigns beside the waters yet in pride. Rude voices cry: but in her ears the chime Of full, sad bells brings back her old springtide. Like to a queen in pride of place, she wears The splendour of a crown in Radcliffe's dome. Well fare she, well! As perfect beauty fares; And those high places, that are beauty's home.</p "Oxford"

Ralph Waldo Emerson photo

„Beauty is the mark God sets upon virtue.“

—  Ralph Waldo Emerson American philosopher, essayist, and poet 1803 - 1882
1830s, Nature http://www.emersoncentral.com/nature.htm (1836), Ch. 3, Beauty

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Harriet Beecher Stowe photo
George Sand photo

„The beauty that addresses itself to the eyes," she continued, "is only the spell of the moment; the eye of the body is not always that of the soul.“

—  George Sand French novelist and memoirist; pseudonym of Lucile Aurore Dupin 1804 - 1876
La beauté qui parle aux yeux, reprit-elle, n’est que le prestige d’un moment; l’œuil du corps n'est pas toujours celui de l'âme. Le Beau Laurence, ch. 1 (1870); Carroll Owen (trans.) Handsome Lawrence (Boston: James R. Osgood, 1871) p. 30

John Muir photo

„Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where Nature may heal and cheer and give strength to body and soul alike.“

—  John Muir Scottish-born American naturalist and author 1838 - 1914
1910s, The Yosemite http://www.sierraclub.org/john_muir_exhibit/writings/the_yosemite/ (1912), chapter 15: Hetch Hetchy Valley

Aurelius Augustinus photo

„Beauty grows in you to the extent that love grows, because charity itself is the soul's beauty.“

—  Aurelius Augustinus early Christian theologian and philosopher 354 - 430
Ten Homilies on the First Epistle of John (414), Quantum in te crescit amor, tantum crescit pulchritudo; quia ipsa caritas est animae pulchritudo. Ninth Homily, Paragraph 9, as translated by Boniface Ramsey (2008) Augustinian Heritage Institute Variant translation: Inasmuch as love grows in you, in so much beauty grows; for love is itself the beauty of the soul. as translated by H. Browne and J. H. Meyers, The Nicene and Post Nicene Fathers (1995)

Letitia Elizabeth Landon photo

„It was a beautiful embodied thought,
A dream of the fine painter, one of those
That pass by moonlight o'er the soul, and flit
'Mid the dim shades of twilight, when the eye
Grows tearful with its ecstasy.“

—  Letitia Elizabeth Landon English poet and novelist 1802 - 1838
The London Literary Gazette, 1821-1822, (1st June 1822) Poetic Sketches. Second Series - Sketch the Fifth. Mr. Martin’s Picture of Clytie 8th June 1822) The Deserter see The Improvisatrice (1824

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 Plotinus photo

„It is now time, leaving every object of sense far behind, to contemplate, by a certain ascent, a beauty of a much higher order; a beauty not visible to the corporeal eye, but alone manifest to the brighter eye of the soul, independent of all corporeal aid.“

—  Plotinus Neoplatonist philosopher 203 - 270
An Essay on the Beautiful, Context: It is now time, leaving every object of sense far behind, to contemplate, by a certain ascent, a beauty of a much higher order; a beauty not visible to the corporeal eye, but alone manifest to the brighter eye of the soul, independent of all corporeal aid. However, since, without some previous perception of beauty it is impossible to express by words the beauties of sense, but we must remain in the state of the blind, so neither can we ever speak of the beauty of offices and sciences, and whatever is allied to these, if deprived of their intimate possession. Thus we shall never be able to tell of virtue's brightness, unless by looking inward we perceive the fair countenance of justice and temperance, and are convinced that neither the evening nor morning star are half so beautiful and bright. But it is requisite to perceive objects of this kind by that eye by which the soul beholds such real beauties. Besides it is necessary that whoever perceives this species of beauty, should be seized with much greater delight, and more vehement admiration, than any corporeal beauty can excite; as now embracing beauty real and substantial. Such affections, I say, ought to be excited about true beauty, as admiration and sweet astonishment; desire also and love and a pleasant trepidation. For all souls, as I may say, are affected in this manner about invisible objects, but those the most who have the strongest propensity to their love; as it likewise happens about corporeal beauty; for all equally perceive beautiful corporeal forms, yet all are not equally excited, but lovers in the greatest degree.

Louisa May Alcott photo

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