„Since liberalism has become a kind of official party line, we have been enjoined against saying things about races, religions or national groups, for after all, there is no categorical statement without its implication of value, and values begin divisions among men. We must not define, subsume, or judge; we must rather rest on the periphery and display “sensibility toward the cultural expressions of all lands and peoples.” This is a process of emasculation.“

—  Richard M. Weaver, p. 59.
Richard M. Weaver110
American scholar 1910 - 1963
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„People define themselves in terms of ancestry, religion, language, history, values, customs, and institutions. They identify with cultural groups: tribes, ethnic groups, religious communities, nations, and, at the broadest level, civilizations. People use politics not just to advance their interests but also to define their identity. We know who we are only when we know who we are not and often only when we know whom we are against.“

—  Samuel P. Huntington American political scientist 1927 - 2008
Context: In the post-Cold War world, for the first time in history, global politics has become multipolar and multicivilizational. During most of human existence, contacts between civilizations were intermittent or nonexistent. Then, with the beginning of the modern era, about A. D. 1500, global politics assumed two dimensions. For over four hundred years, the nation states of the West — Britain, France, Spain, Austria, Prussia, Germany, the United States, and others — constituted a multipolar international system within Western civilization and interacted, competed, and fought wars with each other. At the same time, Western nations also expanded, conquered, colonized, or decisively influenced every other civilization. During the Cold War global politics became bipolar and the world was divided into three parts. A group of mostly wealthy and democratic societies, led by the United States, was engaged in a pervasive ideological, political, economic, and, at times, military competition with a group of somewhat poorer communist societies associated with and led by the Soviet Union. Much of this conflict occurred in the Third World outside these two camps, composed of countries which often were poor, lacked political stability, were recently independent, and claimed to be nonaligned. In the late 1980s the communist world collapsed, and the Cold War international system became history. In the post-Cold War world, the most important distinctions among peoples are not ideological, political, or economic. They are cultural. Peoples and nations are attempting to answer the most basic question humans can face: Who are we? And they are answering that question in the traditional way human beings have answered it, by reference to the things that mean most to them. People define themselves in terms of ancestry, religion, language, history, values, customs, and institutions. They identify with cultural groups: tribes, ethnic groups, religious communities, nations, and, at the broadest level, civilizations. People use politics not just to advance their interests but also to define their identity. We know who we are only when we know who we are not and often only when we know whom we are against. Nation states remain the principal actors in world affairs. Their behavior is shaped as in the past by the pursuit of power and wealth, but it is also shaped by cultural preferences, commonalities, and differences. The most important groupings of states are no longer the three blocs of the Cold War but rather the world’s seven or eight major civilizations. Non-Western societies, particularly in East Asia, are developing their economic wealth and creating the basis for enhanced military power and political influence. As their power and self-confidence increase, non-Western societies increasingly assert their own cultural values and reject those “imposed” on them by the West. Ch. 1: The New Era in World Politics, § 2 : A Multipolar, Multicivilizational World

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„We discussed education and culture and how we can inculcate values. The other issue was pollution of ideology, national ideology... Some people alleged that we are doing saffronisation. If at all saffronisation has been done, it has been done by the public of India. We accept the mandate of the people.“

—  Mahesh Sharma Indian politician 1959
On saffronisation, as quoted in " 'Saffronisation' Done by Public When They Gave Mandate to BJP: Mahesh Sharma http://www.outlookindia.com/news/article/saffronisation-done-by-public-when-they-gave-mandate-to-bjp-mahesh-sharma/912013" Outlook (7 September 2015)

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„We may have different religions, different languages, different colored skin, but we all belong to one human race. We all share the same basic values.“

—  Kofi Annan 7th Secretary-General of the United Nations 1938
As quoted in Simply Living: The Spirit of the Indigenous People (1999) edited by Shirley A. Jones <!-- p. xxi -->

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„I think we ought to welcome people from different cultures to America. The great thing about America is we ought to be confident in knowing that everybody becomes an American. And we share the same value system.“

—  George W. Bush 43rd President of the United States 1946
Context: And you realize that we share the same values. Faith, family, you know, hard work, commitment to service and I think we ought to welcome people from different cultures to America. The great thing about America is we ought to be confident in knowing that everybody becomes an American. And we share the same value system. In other words, there's a great capacity for our society to assimilate people.

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„We want to build a clean and healthy party (People's Justice Party) with noble ethical values and as leaders, we must give reminders and advice to everyone so that the party will progress smoothly.“

—  Mohamed Azmin Ali Malaysian politician 1964
Mohamed Azmin Ali (2018) cited in " Mohamed Azmin: Dr M wants more time to look into suitability of ECRL https://www.edgeprop.my/content/1430635/mohamed-azmin-dr-m-wants-more-time-look-suitability-ecrl" on EdgeProp, 5 October 2018

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