„[In-group exclusivism has] killed more human beings and destroyed more cities and villages than all the epidemics, hurricanes, storms, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions taken together. It has brought upon mankind more suffering than any other catastrophe.“

—  Pitirim Sorokin, Pitirim Sorokin (1954) http://books.google.nl/books?id=DGCleCxTkbIC The Ways and Power of Love http://what-when-how.com/love-in-world-religions/altruistic-love/. p. 461; As cited in: "[ Altruistic Love]" on what-when-how: In Depth Tutorials and Information
Pitirim Sorokin photo
Pitirim Sorokin3
1889 - 1968
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Margaret MacMillan photo
Dylan Thomas photo
Publicidade
Joseph Lewis photo
Xi Jinping photo

„The issue [Israeli-Palestinian conflict], already lasting more than half a century, has brought deep suffering to the Palestinian people and remains an important reason of extended turbulence in the Middle East region.“

—  Xi Jinping General Secretary of the Communist Party of China and paramount leader of China 1953
As quoted in "China rebukes Israel ahead of Netanyahu visit" http://edition.cnn.com/2013/05/07/world/asia/china-israel-talks/index.html?hpt=hp_t2 in cnn.com (7 May 2013).

George Orwell photo
Leo Tolstoy photo
Mark Twain photo
François de La Rochefoucauld photo

„There are few people who are more often wrong than those who cannot suffer being wrong.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld French author of maxims and memoirs 1613 - 1680
Il n'y a point de gens qui aient plus souvent tort que ceux qui ne peuvent souffrir d'en avoir. Maxim 386.

Leigh Hunt photo

„Fishes do not roar; they cannot express any sound of suffering; and therefore the angler chooses to think they do not suffer, more than it is convenient for him to fancy.“

—  Leigh Hunt English critic, essayist, poet and writer 1784 - 1859
Context: Fishes do not roar; they cannot express any sound of suffering; and therefore the angler chooses to think they do not suffer, more than it is convenient for him to fancy. Now it is a poor sport that depends for its existence on the want of a voice in the sufferer, and of imagination in the sportsman. Revised edition, London, Smith, Elder & Co., 1889, p. 114

„The study convincingly indicates that African diet was previously more varied, being based on a more diversified agriculture than was possible under colonialism. In terms of specific nutritional deficiencies, those Africans who suffered most under colonialism were those who were brought most fully into the colonial economy: namely, the urban workers.“

—  Walter Rodney Guyanese politician, activist and historian 1942 - 1980
Context: Finally, attention must be drawn to one of the most important consequences of colonialism on African development, and that is the stunting effect on Africans as a physical species. Colonialism created conditions which led not just to periodic famine but to chronic undernourishment, malnutrition, and deterioration in the physique of the African people. If such a statement sounds wildly extravagant, it is only because bourgeois propaganda has conditioned even Africans to believe that malnutrition and starvation were the natural lot of Africans from time immemorial. A black child with a transparent rib cage, huge head, bloated stomach, protruding eyes, and twigs as arms and legs was the favorite poster of the large British charitable operation known as Oxfam. The poster represented a case of kwashiorkor—extreme malignant malnutrition. Oxfam called upon the people of Europe to save starving African and Asian children from kwashiorkor and such ills. Oxfam never bothered their consciences by telling them that capitalism and colonialism created the starvation, suffering, and misery of the child in the first place. There is an excellent study of the phenomenon of hunger on a world scale by a Brazilian scientist, Josue de Castro. It incorporates considerable data on the food and health conditions among Africans in their independent pre-colonial state or in societies untouched by capitalist pressures; and it then makes comparisons with colonial conditions. The study convincingly indicates that African diet was previously more varied, being based on a more diversified agriculture than was possible under colonialism. In terms of specific nutritional deficiencies, those Africans who suffered most under colonialism were those who were brought most fully into the colonial economy: namely, the urban workers. p. 373.

John Whiteaker photo
H. G. Wells photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“