„What do I care about Jupiter? Justice is a human issue, and I do not need a god to teach it to me.“

—  Jean Paul Sartre, The Flies

Orestes, Act 2
The Flies (1943)

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Jean Paul Sartre photo
Jean Paul Sartre105
Filósofo existencialista, escritor, dramaturgo, roteirista,… 1905 - 1980

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„Teach me, my God and King,
In all things thee to see
And what I do in any thing,
To do it as for thee..“

—  George Herbert Welsh-born English poet, orator and Anglican priest 1593 - 1633

Fonte: The Temple (1633), The Elixir, Lines 1-4

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„I do not care to know your various theories about God.“

—  Swami Vivekananda Indian Hindu monk and phylosopher 1863 - 1902

Call to the Nation
Contexto: Buddha is the only prophet who said, I do not care to know your various theories about God. What is the use of discussing all the subtle doctrines about the soul? Do good and be good.

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„I need the Lord's guidance on what to do… I asked God for wisdom.“

—  Ben Carson 17th and current United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development; American neurosurgeon 1951

Fonte: Think Big (1996), p. 16

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„God cares, and humanity cares, and I care; and with God’s help I shall not fail. I may not see the end; but it will come and I shall be vindicated“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

Anecdote recorded as something that Lincoln said in a conversation with educator Newman Bateman in the Autumn of 1860, in Life of Abraham Lincoln (1866) by Josiah Gilbert Holland, Chapter XVI, p. 287<!-- University of Nebraska Press -->
Posthumous attributions
Contexto: I know there is a God, and that He hates injustice and slavery. I see the storm coming, and I know that His hand is in it. If He has a place and work for me — and I think He has — I believe I am ready. I am nothing, but truth is everything. I know I am right because I know that liberty is right, for Christ teaches it, and Christ is God. I have told them that a house divided against itself cannot stand, and Christ and reason say the same; and they will find it so. Douglas doesn't care whether slavery is voted up or voted down, but God cares, and humanity cares, and I care; and with God’s help I shall not fail. I may not see the end; but it will come and I shall be vindicated; and these men will find that they have not read their Bibles aright.

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„The Stoics also teach that God is unity, and that he is called Mind and Fate and Jupiter, and by many other names besides.“

—  Diogenes Laërtius biographer of ancient Greek philosophers 180 - 240

Zeno, 68.
The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers (c. 200 A.D.), Book 7: The Stoics

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„I am to do justice, and demand that of all, — a universal human debt, a universal human claim.“

—  Theodore Parker abolitionist 1810 - 1860

Ten Sermons of Religion (1853), III : Of Justice and the Conscience https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Ten_Sermons_of_Religion/Of_Justice_and_the_Conscience
Contexto: Justice is moral temperance in the world of men. It keeps just relations between men; one man, however little, must not be sacrificed to another, however great, to a majority, or to all men. It holds the balance betwixt nation and nation, for a nation is but a larger man; betwixt a man and his family, tribe, nation, race; between mankind and God. It is the universal regulator which coordinates man with man, each with all, — me with the ten hundred millions of men, so that my absolute rights and theirs do not interfere, nor our ultimate interests ever clash, nor my eternal welfare prove antagonistic to the blessedness of all or any one. I am to do justice, and demand that of all, — a universal human debt, a universal human claim.

„When I write I am attempting to do justice to something I have glimpsed about the world.“

—  Jan Zwicky Canadian philosopher 1955

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„What do I know about God and the purpose of life?
I know that this world exists.“

—  Ludwig Wittgenstein Austrian-British philosopher 1889 - 1951

Journal entry (11 June 1916), p. 72e and 73e
1910s, Notebooks 1914-1916
Contexto: What do I know about God and the purpose of life?
I know that this world exists.
That I am placed in it like my eye in its visual field.
That something about it is problematic, which we call its meaning.
This meaning does not lie in it but outside of it.
That life is the world.
That my will penetrates the world.
That my will is good or evil.
Therefore that good and evil are somehow connected with the meaning of the world.
The meaning of life, i. e. the meaning of the world, we can call God.
And connect with this the comparison of God to a father.
To pray is to think about the meaning of life.

„It is predictable that God will take care of us. What's unpredictable is how he will do it.“

—  Donna VanLiere American writer 1966

Fonte: Finding Grace: A True Story About Losing Your Way In Life...And Finding It Again

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„First, then, God, being all-just, wishes to do justice; being all-wise, knows what justice is; being all-powerful, can do justice. Why then injustice?“

—  Voltairine de Cleyre American anarchist writer and feminist 1866 - 1912

The Economic Tendency of Freethought (1890)
Contexto: First, then, God, being all-just, wishes to do justice; being all-wise, knows what justice is; being all-powerful, can do justice. Why then injustice? Either your God can do justice and won't or doesn't know what justice is, or he cannot do it. The immediate reply is: "What appears to be injustice in our eyes, in the sight of omniscience may be justice. God's ways are not our ways."
Oh, but if he is the all-wise pattern, they should be; what is good enough for God ought to be good enough for man; but what is too mean for man won't do in a God.

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„What the mysterious is I do not know. I do not call it God because God has come to mean much that I do not believe in.“

—  Jawaharlal Nehru Indian lawyer, statesman, and writer, first Prime Minister of India 1889 - 1964

Autobiography (1936; 1949; 1958)
Contexto: What the mysterious is I do not know. I do not call it God because God has come to mean much that I do not believe in. I find myself incapable of thinking of a deity or of any unknown supreme power in anthropomorphic terms, and the fact that many people think so is continually a source of surprise to me. Any idea of a personal God seems very odd to me.
Intellectually, I can appreciate to some extent the conception of monism, and I have been attracted towards the Advaita (non-dualist) philosophy of the Vedanta, though I do not presume to understand it in all its depth and intricacy, and I realise that merely an intellectual appreciation of such matters does not carry one far. <!-- p. 16 (1946)