„So much one man can do,
That does both act and know.“

Andrew Marvell photo
Andrew Marvell
1621 - 1678
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Yoshida Shoin photo
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„So if that little thing can do so much, who knows what else we can experience?“

—  Kathy Acker American novelist, playwright, essayist, and poet 1947 - 1997
Context: A friend told me that there are these clean and sober dykes that have piercings every couple months just to get high. It's about learning about my body. I didn't know my body could do this. It's not exactly pleasure. It's more like vision. I didn't know the body is such a visionary factory. Basically we grew up not wanting to know that we had bodies. And it's not as if these piercings are in that deep — it's just on the surface. So if that little thing can do so much, who knows what else we can experience?

Horace Mann photo

„To know how much there is that we do not know, is one of the most valuable parts of our attainments; for such knowledge becomes both a lesson of humility and a stimulus to exertion.“

—  Horace Mann American politician 1796 - 1859
Context: The most ignorant are the most conceited. Unless a man knows that there is something more to be known, his inference is, of course, that he knows every thing. Such a man always usurps the throne of universal knowledge, and assumes the right of deciding all possible questions. We all know that a conceited dunce will decide questions extemporaneous which would puzzle a college of philosophers, or a bench of judges. Ignorant and shallow-minded men do not see far enough to see the difficulty. But let a man know that there are things to be known, of which he is ignorant, and it is so much carved out of his domain of universal knowledge. And for all purposes of individual character, as well as of social usefulness, it is quite as important for a man to know the extent of his own ignorance as it is to know any thing else. To know how much there is that we do not know, is one of the most valuable parts of our attainments; for such knowledge becomes both a lesson of humility and a stimulus to exertion. Lecture 6

Francis Bacon photo
 Democritus photo

„The animal needing something knows how much it needs, the man does not.“

—  Democritus Ancient Greek philosopher, pupil of Leucippus, founder of the atomic theory 460
Freeman (1948), p. 162 Variant: The needy animal knows how much it needs, but the needy man does not.

Anatole France photo
Sören Kierkegaard photo
Gaio Valerio Catullo photo

„What he himself is, whether he is or is not, he does not know so much as this.“

—  Gaio Valerio Catullo Latin poet -84 - -54 a.C.
Ipse qui sit, utrum sit an non sit, id quoque nescit. XVII, line 22

Joseph Goebbels photo

„A child laughs when it feels joy and cries when it feels pain. Both things, laughing and crying, it does with its whole heart. We have all become so tall and so clever. We know so much and we have read so much. But one thing we have forgot: to laugh and cry like the children do.“

—  Joseph Goebbels Nazi politician and Propaganda Minister 1897 - 1945
Das Kind lacht, wenn es Freude hat, und weint, wenn es Schmerz empfindet. Bei beidem, bei Lachen und Weinen ist sein ganzes Herz dabei. Wir sind alle so groß und klug geworden. Wir wissen so viel und haben so viel gelesen. Aber eines haben wir vergessen: zu lachen und zu weinen wie die Kinder.

George Mason photo

„Does any man suppose that one general national government can exist in so extensive a country as this?“

—  George Mason American delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention 1725 - 1792
Context: Does any man suppose that one general national government can exist in so extensive a country as this? I hope that a government may be framed which may suit us, by drawing a line between the general and state governments, and prevent that dangerous clashing of interest and power, which must, as it now stands, terminate in the destruction of one or the other. When we come to the judiciary, we shall be more convinced that this government will terminate in the annihilation of the state governments: the question then will be, whether a consolidated government can preserve the freedom and secure the rights of the people. If such amendments be introduced as shall exclude danger, I shall most gladly put my hand to it. When such amendments as shall, from the best information, secure the great essential rights of the people, shall be agreed to by gentlemen, I shall most heartily make the greatest concessions, and concur in any reasonable measure to obtain the desirable end of conciliation and unanimity… Address to the Convention (4 June 1788) http://www.wwnorton.com/college/history/archive/resources/documents/ch07_04.htm

Raymond Chandler photo
Paulo Coelho photo
Linus Torvalds photo
Meher Baba photo

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