„We have above all to learn what is to bear and forbear-to bear ridicule, insults, even personal injuries at times, and forebear from returning abuse for abuse. In the words of the Prophet of Nazareth, we have to take up the cross, not because it is pleasant to be persecuted, but because the pain and injury are as nothing by the side of the principle for which they are endured.“

In one of his lectures delivered at Ferguson College in a social conference of the Congress as a counter to the one held by the extremist Tilak group. Quoted in pages= 113

Mahadev Govind Ranade photo
Mahadev Govind Ranade15
Indian scholar, social reformer and author 1842 - 1901

Citações relacionadas

Mahadev Govind Ranade photo

„We must bear our cross…not because it is sweet to suffer, but because the pain and suffering are as nothing compared with the greatness of the issues involved.“

—  Mahadev Govind Ranade Indian scholar, social reformer and author 1842 - 1901

Speaking on issues of two duties of the two ideals of conduct and the two forms of duty quoted in page=488.

Abdel Fattah el-Sisi photo
Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay photo
Seneca the Younger photo

„The cause of anger is the belief that we are injured; this belief, therefore, should not be lightly entertained. We ought not to fly into a rage even when the injury appears to be open and distinct: for some false things bear the semblance of truth. We should always allow some time to elapse, for time discloses the truth.“

—  Seneca the Younger, Moral Essays

De Ira (On Anger): Book 2, cap. 22, line 2
Alternate translation: Time discovers truth. (translator unknown).
Moral Essays
Original: (la) Contra primus itaque causas pugnare debemus; causa autem iracundiae opinio iniuriae est, cui non facile credendum est. Ne apertis quidem manifestisque statim accedendum; quaedam enim falsa ueri speciem ferunt. Dandum semper est tempus: ueritatem dies aperit.

Dinah Craik photo
Swami Sivananda photo
William Cowper photo

„My soul
Shall bear that also; for, by practice taught,
I have learned patience, having much endured.“

—  William Cowper (1731–1800) English poet and hymnodist 1731 - 1800

The Odyssey of Homer: translated into English blank verse (1791), Book V, line 264.

Homér photo

„My soul
Shall bear that also; for, by practice taught,
I have learned patience, having much endured.“

—  Homér, The Odyssey (Cowper)

V. 222–223 (tr. William Cowper).
Odyssey (c. 725 BC)
Original: (el) Τλήσομαι ἐν στήθεσσιν ἔχων ταλαπενθέα θυμόν·
ἤδη γὰρ μάλα πολλὰ πάθον καὶ πολλὰ μόγησα.

Horace Bushnell photo
Barack Obama photo
Diana Gabaldon photo
Marsden Hartley photo
Helen Garner photo
Barack Obama photo

„Each time we gather to inaugurate a President we bear witness to the enduring strength of our Constitution. We affirm the promise of our democracy.“

—  Barack Obama 44th President of the United States of America 1961

2013, Second Inaugural Address (January 2013)
Contexto: Each time we gather to inaugurate a President we bear witness to the enduring strength of our Constitution. We affirm the promise of our democracy. We recall that what binds this nation together is not the colors of our skin or the tenets of our faith or the origins of our names. What makes us exceptional — what makes us American — is our allegiance to an idea articulated in a declaration made more than two centuries ago: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” Today we continue a never-ending journey to bridge the meaning of those words with the realities of our time. For history tells us that while these truths may be self-evident, they’ve never been self-executing; that while freedom is a gift from God, it must be secured by His people here on Earth.

John Holt (Lord Chief Justice) photo
Samuel Richardson photo

„Nothing fails like success because we don't learn from it. We learn only from failure.“

—  Kenneth E. Boulding British-American economist 1910 - 1993

Kenneth Boulding (1971) "The diminishing returns of science" in: New Scientist. (March 25, 1971) Vol. 49, nr. 744. p. 682
1970s
Contexto: Perhaps the most difficult ethical problem of the scientific community arises not so much from conflict with other subcultures as from its own success. Nothing fails like success because we don't learn from it. We learn only from failure.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“