„I ’ll make thee glorious by my pen,
And famous by my sword.“

—  James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose, My Dear and only Love. Compare: "I ’ll make thee famous by my pen, And glorious by my sword", Sir Walter Scott, Legend of Montrose, chap. xv.
James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose photo
James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose2
Scottish nobleman, poet and soldier of the Wars of the Th... 1612 - 1650
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„My pen in this, my sword in that hand hold.“

—  Luís de Camões Portuguese poet 1524 - 1580
Stanza 79, line 8 (tr. Richard Fanshawe)

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„When I behold thee, though my light be dim,
Distant, and low, I can in thine see Him
Who looks upon thee from his glorious throne,
And mindes the covenant 'twixt all and One.“

—  Henry Vaughan Welsh author, physician and metaphysical poet 1621 - 1695
Context: When thou dost shine, darkness looks white and fair, Forms turn to musick, clouds to smiles and air; Rain gently spends his honey-drops, and pours Balm on the cleft earth, milk on grass and flowers. Bright pledge of peace and sun-shine! the sure tye Of thy Lord's hand, the object of his eye. When I behold thee, though my light be dim, Distant, and low, I can in thine see Him Who looks upon thee from his glorious throne, And mindes the covenant 'twixt all and One. "The Rainbow".

Robert Burton photo

„The pen worse than the sword.“

—  Robert Burton English scholar 1577 - 1640
Section 2, member 4, subsection 4.

Stephen Colbert photo

„The pen is mightier than the sword, if you shoot that pen out of a gun“

—  Stephen Colbert American political satirist, writer, comedian, television host, and actor 1964

Harriet Beecher Stowe photo

„There is more done with pens than with swords.“

—  Harriet Beecher Stowe Abolitionist, author 1811 - 1896
This is very similar in theme to "Beneath the rule of men entirely great, The pen is mightier than the sword." by Edward Bulwer-Lytton.

Michelangelo Buonarroti photo

„With few words I shall make thee understand my soul.“

—  Michelangelo Buonarroti Italian sculptor, painter, architect and poet 1475 - 1564

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John Oldham (poet) photo

„I wear my Pen as others do their Sword.
To each affronting sot I meet, the word
Is Satisfaction: straight to thrusts I go,
And pointed satire runs him through and through.“

—  John Oldham (poet) English satirical poet and translator 1653 - 1683
Satire upon a Printer, line 36; reported in Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922).

David Almond photo

„Slowly I would get to pen and paper,
Make my poems for others unseen and unborn.“

—  Muriel Rukeyser poet and political activist 1913 - 1980
Context: Slowly I would get to pen and paper, Make my poems for others unseen and unborn. In the day I would be reminded of those men and women, Brave, setting up signals across vast distances, considering a nameless way of living, of almost unimagined values. "Poem"

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Stanley Baldwin photo

„My tongue, not my pen, is my instrument.“

—  Stanley Baldwin Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1867 - 1947
Conversation with Thomas Jones (7 January 1946), quoted in Thomas Jones, A Diary with Letters. 1931-1950 (London: Oxford University Press, 1954), p. 540.

Imre Kertész photo
Elizabeth Barrett Browning photo

„I praise Thee while my days go on;
I love Thee while my days go on“

—  Elizabeth Barrett Browning English poet, author 1806 - 1861
Context: p>I praise Thee while my days go on; I love Thee while my days go on: Through dark and dearth, through fire and frost, With emptied arms and treasure lost, I thank Thee while my days go on.And having in thy life-depth thrown Being and suffering (which are one), As a child drops his pebble small Down some deep well, and hears it fall Smiling — so I. THY DAYS GO ON.</p St. 23 -24.

Julian of Norwich photo

„I am Ground of thy beseeching: first it is my will that thou have it; and after, I make thee to will it; and after, I make thee to beseech it and thou beseechest it. How should it then be that thou shouldst not have thy beseeching?“

—  Julian of Norwich English theologian and anchoress 1342 - 1416
Context: Our Lord shewed concerning Prayer. In which Shewing I see two conditions in our Lord’s signifying: one is rightfulness, another is sure trust. But yet oftentimes our trust is not full: for we are not sure that God heareth us, as we think because of our unworthiness, and because we feel right nought, (for we are as barren and dry oftentimes after our prayers as we were afore); and this, in our feeling our folly, is cause of our weakness. For thus have I felt in myself. And all this brought our Lord suddenly to my mind, and shewed these words, and said: I am Ground of thy beseeching: first it is my will that thou have it; and after, I make thee to will it; and after, I make thee to beseech it and thou beseechest it. How should it then be that thou shouldst not have thy beseeching?

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