„An honest man speaks the truth, though it may give offence; a vain man, in order that it may.“

—  William Hazlitt, No. 387
William Hazlitt photo
William Hazlitt39
1778 - 1830
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Niccolo Machiavelli photo

„And though, as Tully remarks, the populace may be ignorant, it is capable of grasping the truth and readily yields when a man, worthy of confidence, lays the truth before it.“

—  Niccolo Machiavelli Italian politician, Writer and Author 1469 - 1527
Context: The demands of a free populace, too, are very seldom harmful to liberty, for they are due either to the populace being oppressed or to the suspicious that it is going to be oppressed... and, should these impressions be false, a remedy is provided in the public platform on which some man of standing can get up, appeal to the crowd, and show that it is mistaken. And though, as Tully remarks, the populace may be ignorant, it is capable of grasping the truth and readily yields when a man, worthy of confidence, lays the truth before it. Book 1, Ch. 4 (as translated by LJ Walker and B Crick)

Geoffrey Chaucer photo

„Truth is the highest thing that man may keep.“

—  Geoffrey Chaucer English poet 1343 - 1400
The Franklin's Tale, l. 11789

Publicidade
Samuel Johnson photo
Edmund Burke photo
Leon R. Kass photo

„To seek an honest man is, at once, to seek a human being worthy of the name, an honest-to-goodness exemplar of the idea of humanity, a truthful and truth-speaking embodiment of the animal having the power of articulate speech.“

—  Leon R. Kass American academic 1939
Context: Diogenes … refuses to be taken in by complacent popular belief that we already know human goodness from our daily experience, or by confident professorial claims that we can capture the mystery of our humanity in ­definitions. But mocking or not, and perhaps speaking better than he knew, Diogenes gave elegantly simple expression to the humanist quest for self-knowledge: I seek the human being — my human being, your human being, our humanity. In fact, the embellished version of Diogenes' question comes to the same thing: To seek an honest man is, at once, to seek a human being worthy of the name, an honest-to-goodness exemplar of the idea of humanity, a truthful and truth-speaking embodiment of the animal having the power of articulate speech.

Robert Musil photo
Stephen Crane photo
Juliet Marillier photo
Publicidade
Thomas Browne photo
Charles Brockden Brown photo
Virginia Woolf photo

„Over the obscure man is poured the merciful suffusion of darkness. None knows where he goes or comes. He may seek the truth and speak it; he alone is free; he alone is truthful, he alone is at peace.“

—  Virginia Woolf English writer 1882 - 1941
Context: While fame impedes and constricts, obscurity wraps about a man like a mist; obscurity is dark, ample, and free; obscurity lets the mind take its way unimpeded. Over the obscure man is poured the merciful suffusion of darkness. None knows where he goes or comes. He may seek the truth and speak it; he alone is free; he alone is truthful, he alone is at peace. Ch. 2

William Ellery Channing photo

„In truth, moral evil, if unresisted and habitual, may so blight and lay waste these capacities, that the image of God in man may seem to be wholly destroyed.“

—  William Ellery Channing United States Unitarian clergyman 1780 - 1842
Context: I begin with observing, what all indeed will understand, that the likeness to God, of which I propose to speak, belongs to man's higher or spiritual nature. It has its foundation in the original and essential capacities of the mind. In proportion as these are unfolded by right and vigorous exertion, it is extended and brightened. In proportion as these lie dormant, it is obscured. In proportion as they are perverted and overpowered by the appetites and passions, it is blotted out. In truth, moral evil, if unresisted and habitual, may so blight and lay waste these capacities, that the image of God in man may seem to be wholly destroyed. "Likeness to God", an address in Providence, Rhode Island (1828)

Publicidade
Robert Graves photo

„The dead may speak the truth only, even when it discredits themselves.“

—  Robert Graves English poet and novelist 1895 - 1985
The Golden Fleece (1944), Invocation.

Robert Jordan photo
Emily Brontë photo
Próximo