„It's not a pretty face, I grant you. But underneath its flabby exterior is an enormous lack of character.“

—  Oscar Levant, Describing himself, in lines he contributed to An American In Paris (1951), although officially credited to Alan Jay Lerner, as told in The Memoirs of an Amnesiac (1965); also quoted in The Dictionary of Biographical Quotation of British and American Subjects (1978) by Richard Kenin and Justin Wintle, p. 485.
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Oscar Levant4
1906 - 1972
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„The face is its own fate — a man does what he must —
And the body underneath it says: I am.“

—  Randall Jarrell poet, critic, novelist, essayist 1914 - 1965
Context: Death and the devil, what are these to him? His being accuses him — and yet his face is firm In resolution, in absolute persistence; The folds of smiling do for steadiness; The face is its own fate — a man does what he must — And the body underneath it says: I am. "The Knight, Death and the Devil," lines 34-39

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„Grant us wisdom, grant us courage,
For the facing of this hour,
For the facing of this hour.“

—  Harry Emerson Fosdick American pastor 1878 - 1969
Context: God of grace and God of glory, On Thy people pour Thy power. Crown Thine ancient church’s story, Bring her bud to glorious flower. Grant us wisdom, grant us courage, For the facing of this hour, For the facing of this hour.

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„I don't know how to break the news, but
It's pretty clear you'll be asked to choose between
What you lack and what you excuse“

—  Aimee Mann American indie rock singer-songwriter (born 1960) 1960
Context: I don't know how to break the news, but It's pretty clear you'll be asked to choose between What you lack and what you excuse In this tug of war You can't say that they didn't warn you Though you'd rather that they just ignore you Cause your devices are not working for you anymore What you want, you don't know You're with stupid now "You're With Stupid Now" · 2008 performance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjwfNAYdBVQ

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„It will be a thousand years before Grant's character is fully appreciated. Grant is the greatest soldier of our time if not all time.“

—  William T. Sherman American General, businessman, educator, and author. 1820 - 1891
Context: It will be a thousand years before Grant's character is fully appreciated. Grant is the greatest soldier of our time if not all time... he fixes in his mind what is the true objective and abandons all minor ones. He dismisses all possibility of defeat. He believes in himself and in victory. If his plans go wrong he is never disconcerted but promptly devises a new one and is sure to win in the end. Grant more nearly impersonated the American character of 1861-65 than any other living man. Therefore he will stand as the typical hero of the great Civil War in America. On Ulysses S. Grant http://www.granthomepage.com/grantgeneral.htm (1885), as quoted in Grant's Final Victory: Ulysses S. Grant's Heroic Last Year (2011) http://books.google.com/books?id=MZ2BiGC3gHwC&pg=PR8&lpg=PR8&dq=sherman+%22It+will+be+a+thousand+years+before+Grant's+character+is+fully+appreciated%22&source=bl&ots=YddNqD14gr&sig=lO5z_VXQoQ5iY_eSJGot5qHy_JM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=vF65UsC5L-XIsASH6YDICw&ved=0CD0Q6AEwBA#v=onepage&q&f=false, by Charles Bracelen Flood.

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„I do not care what face other ages and other people have given to the enormous, faceless essence.“

—  Nikos Kazantzakis Greek writer 1883 - 1957
Context: I do not care what face other ages and other people have given to the enormous, faceless essence. They have crammed it with human virtues, with rewards and punishments, with certain ties. They have given a face to their hopes and fears, they have submitted their anarchy to a rhythm, they have found a higher justification by which to live and labor. They have fulfilled their duty. But today we have gone beyond these needs; we have shattered this particular mask of the Abyss; our God no longer fits under the old features. Our hearts have overbrimmed with new agonies, with new luster and silence. The mystery has grown savage, and God has grown greater. The dark powers ascend, for they have also grown greater, and the entire human island quakes. Let us stoop down to our hearts and confront the Abyss valiantly. Let us try to mold once more, with our flesh and blood, the new, contemporary face of God. For our God is not an abstract thought, a logical necessity, a high and harmonious structure made of deductions and speculations. He is not an immaculate, neutral, odorless, distilled product of our brains, neither male nor female. He is both man and woman, mortal and immortal, dung and spirit. He gives birth, fecundates, slaughters — death and eros in one — and then he begets and slays once more, dancing spaciously beyond the boundaries of a logic which cannot contain the antinomies.

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„Even in harmonious families there is this double life: the group life, which is the one we can observe in our neighbour's household, and, underneath, another — secret and passionate and intense — which is the real life that stamps the faces and gives character to the voices of our friends.“

—  Willa Cather American writer and novelist 1873 - 1947
Context: Even in harmonious families there is this double life: the group life, which is the one we can observe in our neighbour's household, and, underneath, another — secret and passionate and intense — which is the real life that stamps the faces and gives character to the voices of our friends. Always in his mind each member of these social units is escaping, running away, trying to break the net which circumstances and his own affections have woven about him.