„He sipped at a weak hock and seltzer
As he gazed at the London skies
Through the Nottingham lace of the curtains
Or was it his bees-winged eyes?“

—  John Betjeman, Poetry, "The Arrest of Oscar Wilde at the Cadogan Hotel" line 1, from Continual Dew.
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John Betjeman
1906 - 1984
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„The bee and the serpent often sip from the selfsame flower.“

—  Pietro Metastasio Italian poet and librettist (born 3 January 1698, died 12 April 1782) 1698 - 1782
Morte d' Abele (1732), L'ape e la serpe spesso Suggon l'istesso umore; Part I.

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„A fairytale, like a butterfly or a bee, helps itself on all sides, sips at every wholesome flower, and spoils not one.“

—  George MacDonald Scottish journalist, novelist 1824 - 1905
The Fantastic Imagination (1893), Context: A fairytale, like a butterfly or a bee, helps itself on all sides, sips at every wholesome flower, and spoils not one. The true fairytale is, to my mind, very like the sonata. We all know that a sonata means something; and where there is the faculty of talking with suitable vagueness, and choosing metaphor sufficiently loose, mind may approach mind, in the interpretation of a sonata, with the result of a more or less contenting consciousness of sympathy. But if two or three men sat down to write each what the sonata meant to him, what approximation to definite idea would be the result? Little enough — and that little more than needful. We should find it had roused related, if not identical, feelings, but probably not one common thought. Has the sonata therefore failed? Had it undertaken to convey, or ought it to be expected to impart anything defined, anything notionally recognizable? "But words are not music; words at least are meant and fitted to carry a precise meaning!" It is very seldom indeed that they carry the exact meaning of any user of them! And if they can be so used as to convey definite meaning, it does not follow that they ought never to carry anything else. Words are like things that may be variously employed to various ends. They can convey a scientific fact, or throw a shadow of her child's dream on the heart of a mother. They are things to put together like the pieces of a dissected map, or to arrange like the notes on a stave.

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 Martial photo

„The bee enclosed and through the amber shown
Seems buried in the juice which was his own.“

—  Martial, livro Epigrammata
Epigrams (c. 80 – 104 AD), IV, 32, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919). Compare: "Whence we see spiders, flies, or ants entombed and preserved forever in amber, a more than royal tomb", Francis Bacon, Historia Vitæ et Mortis; Sylva Sylvarum, Cent. i. experiment 100.

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„916. The little cannot bee great, unlesse he devoure many.“

—  George Herbert Welsh-born English poet, orator and Anglican priest 1593 - 1633
Jacula Prudentum (1651)

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