„The abolition of the market means not only that the consumers—that is all members of society—are robbed of virtually all choice of consumption and all influence over production; it also means that the information and communication are monopolized by the State, as they too need a vast material base in order to operate. The abolition of the market means, then, that both material and intellectual assets would be totally rationed. To say nothing of the inefficiency of production convincingly demonstrated in the history of communism, this economy requires an omnipotent police state. Briefly: the abolition of the market means a gulag society.“

"The Self-Poisoning of the Open Society"

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Leszek Kołakowski photo
Leszek Kołakowski3
1927 - 2009

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