„If we would despise the enemy, our thoughts must always be of God and our souls always glad with hope.“

— Antão do Deserto, Book II, Chapter 10
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John of St. Samson photo
George Gordon Byron photo

„O'er the glad waters of the dark blue sea,
Our thoughts as boundless, and our souls as free“

— George Gordon Byron English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement 1788 - 1824
Context: O'er the glad waters of the dark blue sea, Our thoughts as boundless, and our souls as free, Far as the breeze can bear, the billows foam, 22 Survey our empire, and behold our home! These are our realms, no limit to their sway,— Our flag the sceptre all who meet obey. Canto I, stanza 1.

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Georges Bernanos photo
Brandon Mull photo
John Calvin photo
Lyndon B. Johnson photo

„Our enemies have always made the same mistake.“

— Lyndon B. Johnson American politician, 36th president of the United States (in office from 1963 to 1969) 1908 - 1973
Context: Our enemies have always made the same mistake. In my lifetime—in depression and in war—they have awaited our defeat. Each time, from the secret places of the American heart, came forth the faith they could not see or that they could not even imagine. It brought us victory. And it will again. For this is what America is all about. It is the uncrossed desert and the unclimbed ridge. It is the star that is not reached and the harvest sleeping in the unplowed ground. Is our world gone? We say "Farewell." Is a new world coming? We welcome it—and we will bend it to the hopes of man.

Mao Zedong photo

„Strategically we should despise all our enemies, while tactically we should take them all seriously.“

— Mao Zedong Chairman of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China 1893 - 1976
Speech http://books.google.com/books?id=ftv7ks-Ehq0C&q=%22strategically+we+should+despise+all+our+enemies+while+tactically+we+should+take+them+all+seriously%22&pg=PA789#v=onepage in Moscow at the meeting of Communist and Workers Parties of Socialist Countries https://www.marxists.org/history/international/comintern/sino-soviet-split/other/1957declaration.htm (18 November 1957)

Julian of Norwich photo
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 Voltaire photo

„I always made one prayer to God, a very short one. Here it is: "O Lord, make our enemies quite ridiculous!" God granted it.“

—  Voltaire French writer, historian, and philosopher 1694 - 1778
Letter to Étienne Noël Damilaville (16 May 1767)

Josip Broz Tito photo

„Churchill, he is a great man. He is, of course, our enemy and has always been the enemy of Communism, but he is an enemy one must respect, an enemy one likes to have.“

— Josip Broz Tito Yugoslav revolutionary and statesman 1892 - 1980
Jasper Ridley, Tito: A Biography (Constable and Company Ltd., 1994), p. 323.

Julian of Norwich photo
 Thucydides photo

„In practice we always base our preparations against an enemy on the assumption that his plans are good; indeed, it is right to rest our hopes not on a belief in his blunders, but on the soundness of our provisions. Nor ought we to believe that there is much difference between man and man, but to think that the superiority lies with him who is reared in the severest school.“

—  Thucydides Greek historian and Athenian general 460
Variant translation: "Instead, we think the plans of our neighbors are as good as our own, and we can't work out whose chances at war are better in a speech. So we always make our preparations in action, on the assumption that our enemies know what they are doing. We should not build our hopes on the belief that they will make mistakes, but on our own careful foresight. And we should not think there is much difference between one man and another, except that the winner will be the one whose education was the most severe." Translation by Paul Woodruff. Variant translation: "There is no need to suppose that human beings differ very much from one another: but it is true that the ones who come out on top are the ones who have been trained in the hardest school." Note: Some versions omit the "who have been". Book I, 1.84-[4]

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 Sallustius photo

„It is impious to suppose that the divine is affected for good or ill by human things. The Gods are always good and always do good and never harm, being always in the same state and like themselves. The truth simply is that, when we are good, we are joined to the Gods by our likeness to live according to virtue we cling to the Gods, and when we become evil we make the Gods our enemies — not because they are angered against us, but because our sins prevent the light of the Gods from shining upon us, and put us in communion with spirits of punishment.“

—  Sallustius Roman philosopher and writer
Context: If any one thinks the doctrine of the unchangeableness of the Gods is reasonable and true, and then wonders how it is that they rejoice in the good and reject the bad, are angry with sinners and become propitious when appeased, the answer is as follows: God does not rejoice — for that which rejoices also grieves; nor is he angered — for to be angered is a passion; nor is he appeased by gifts — if he were, he would be conquered by pleasure. It is impious to suppose that the divine is affected for good or ill by human things. The Gods are always good and always do good and never harm, being always in the same state and like themselves. The truth simply is that, when we are good, we are joined to the Gods by our likeness to live according to virtue we cling to the Gods, and when we become evil we make the Gods our enemies — not because they are angered against us, but because our sins prevent the light of the Gods from shining upon us, and put us in communion with spirits of punishment. And if by prayers and sacrifices we find forgiveness of sins, we do not appease or change the Gods, but by what we do and by our turning toward the divine we heal our own badness and so enjoy again the goodness of the Gods. To say that God turns away from the evil is like saying that the sun hides himself from the blind. XIV. In what sense, though the Gods never change, they are said to be made angry and appeased.

Robert E. Lee photo
Peter Porter photo

„Redeemers always reach the world too late.
God dies, we live; God lives, we die. Our fate.“

— Peter Porter British poet 1929 - 2010
"A Tale of Two Pieties", in The Chair of Babel (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992) p. 51.

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad photo

„We thank God that our enemies are idiots.“

— Mahmoud Ahmadinejad 6th President of the Islamic Republic of Iran 1956
(6 February 2006) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2006/02/06/wiran06.xml&DCMP=EMC-new_06022006

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