„Like most inventors, Pound did not create out of the void. The "Image" he took from T. E. Hulme's table talk. The "ism" was suggested to him by the notes on contemporary French poetry which I wrote for Harold Monro's Poetry Review. The collacation of 'image' and 'ism' came to Pound after I had told him about Divoire's essays on stratégie littéraire.“

—  F. S. Flint, Verse Chronicle, article, The Criterion, 1932
F. S. Flint12
English Imagist poet 1885 - 1960
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„When I was asked to talk about the Obscurity of the Modern Poet I was delighted, for I have suffered from this obscurity all my life. But then I realized that I was being asked to talk not about the fact that people don’t read poetry, but about the fact that most of them wouldn’t understand it if they did: about the difficulty, not the neglect, of contemporary poetry.“

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