„When there is a lack of honor in government, the morals of the whole people are poisoned.“

Quoted in the New York Times (9 August 1964)

Herbert Hoover photo
Herbert Hoover7
1874 - 1964

Citações relacionadas

James A. Michener photo
Andrew Johnson photo

„There are some who lack confidence in the integrity and capacity of the people to govern themselves.“

—  Andrew Johnson American politician, 17th president of the United States (in office from 1865 to 1869) 1808 - 1875

Statement (1853) as quoted in Andrew Johnson, Plebeian and Patriot (1928) by Robert Watson Winston.
Quote
Contexto: There are some who lack confidence in the integrity and capacity of the people to govern themselves. To all who entertain such fears I will most respectfully say that I entertain none... If a man is not capable, and is not to be trusted with the government of himself, is he to be trusted with the government of others... Who, then, will govern? The answer must be, Man — for we have no angels in the shape of men, as yet, who are willing to take charge of our political affairs.

Theodore Roosevelt photo

„The national government belongs to the whole American people, and where the whole American people are interested, that interest can be guarded effectively only by the national government.“

—  Theodore Roosevelt American politician, 26th president of the United States 1858 - 1919

1910s, The New Nationalism (1910)
Contexto: I do not ask for overcentralization; but I do ask that we work in a spirit of broad and far-reaching nationalism when we work for what concerns our people as a whole. We are all Americans. Our common interests are as broad as the continent. I speak to you here in Kansas exactly as I would speak in New York or Georgia, for the most vital problems are those which affect us all alike. The national government belongs to the whole American people, and where the whole American people are interested, that interest can be guarded effectively only by the national government. The betterment which we seek must be accomplished, I believe, mainly through the national government.

Mahendra Chaudhry photo
Charles Bukowski photo
Thomas Jefferson photo

„When governments fear the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

First attributed to Jefferson in 1945, this does not appear in any known Jefferson document. When governments fear the people, there is liberty... http://wiki.monticello.org/mediawiki/index.php/When_governments_fear_the_people,_there_is_liberty...(Quotation), Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia. It first appears in 1914, in [Barnhill, John Basil, John Basil Barnhill, Indictment of Socialism No. 3, Barnhill-Tichenor Debate on Socialism, http://debs.indstate.edu/b262b3_1914.pdf, PDF, 2008-10-16, 1914, National Rip-Saw Publishing, Saint Louis, Missouri, p. 34]
Misattributed
Variante: Where the people fear the government you have tyranny. Where the government fears the people you have liberty.

John F. Kennedy photo

„No government or social system is so evil that its people must be considered as lacking in virtue.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963

1963, American University speech

Ali photo
Herbert Hoover photo
Idries Shah photo
Russell Brand photo
Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood photo

„The old phrase, "Government of the people, by the people, for the people"*, represents a true ideal. It is best for the people as a whole. It is even more clearly the best for the development of the individual man and woman. And since in the end, the character and the prosperity of the nation depend on the character of the individuals that compose it, the form of government which best promotes individual development is the best for the people as a whole.“

—  Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood lawyer, politician and diplomat in the United Kingdom 1864 - 1958

Quoting Abraham Lincoln
The Future of Civilization (1938)
Contexto: In some states of society it may even be that a form of dictatorship is necessary. No doubt in the hands of an able man it may possibly be more efficient than a democratic form of administration. But in the end, I am confident that a free government is best for free people. The old phrase, "Government of the people, by the people, for the people"*, represents a true ideal. It is best for the people as a whole. It is even more clearly the best for the development of the individual man and woman. And since in the end, the character and the prosperity of the nation depend on the character of the individuals that compose it, the form of government which best promotes individual development is the best for the people as a whole.

Nathan Bedford Forrest photo
James Baldwin photo
P. D. James photo
Victor Hugo photo
James Mill photo

„The government and the people are under a moral necessity of acting together; a free press compels them to bend to one another.“

—  James Mill Scottish historian, economist, political theorist and philosopher 1773 - 1836

The Edinburgh Review, vol. 18 (1811), p. 121

John Mearsheimer photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“