„Edgar Cayce gave this reading to counsel for taking proper attitude towards karma.“

—  Edgar Cayce, Context: If the experience is used for self-indulgence, self-aggrandizement, or self-exaltation, the entity does so to its own undoing, and creates for itself that which has been called karma and which must be met. And in meeting every error, every trail, every temptation, whether they may be mental or physical experiences, the approach to it should always be in the attitude of: “Not my will, but Thine, O God, be done in and through me.” Many Mansions, Chapter 7 – Karma in suspension.
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Edgar Cayce1
1877 - 1945
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„Don't worry so much where you live but how you live. Make the family of man your family as well. ( Edgar Cayce On the Millennium Chapter One - The great new planet earth. )“

—  Edgar Cayce Purported clairvoyant healer and psychic 1877 - 1945
Cayce answered this to a minister's question - Where is the safest place to live?

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„This Karma machine only takes quarters.“

—  Matthew Good Canadian singer-songwriter 1971

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„Our attitude toward life determines life's attitude towards us“

—  Earl Nightingale American motivational speaker 1921 - 1989

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„The truth is that it is our attitude towards children that is right, and our attitude towards grown-up people that is wrong.“

—  G. K. Chesterton English mystery novelist and Christian apologist 1874 - 1936
Context: The truth is that it is our attitude towards children that is right, and our attitude towards grown-up people that is wrong. Our attitude towards our equals in age consists in a servile solemnity, overlying a considerable degree of indifference or disdain. Our attitude towards children consists in a condescending indulgence, overlying an unfathomable respect. "A Defence of Baby-Worship"

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„Never take counsel of your fears.“

—  Andrew Jackson American general and politician, 7th president of the United States 1767 - 1845
Quoted as "a favorite maxim" of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson in Memoirs of Stonewall Jackson by His Widow, Mary Anna Jackson, Prentice Press/Courier Journal, 1895; ch. XIII p. 264 archive.org http://archive.org/stream/memoirsstonewal00jackgoog#page/n306/mode/2up%20Seite%20264%20archive.org. Without any reference to Jackson in: Conversations of Our Club. Brownson's Quarterly Review, October 1858. p. 459 books.google http://books.google.de/books?id=wQ7ZAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA459&dq=counsel

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„An example is the changing attitude of psychologists toward popularity, toward adjustment, even toward delinquency.“

—  Abraham Maslow American psychologist 1908 - 1970
Context: I am deliberately rejecting our present easy distinction between sickness and health, at least as far as surface symptoms are concerned. Does sickness mean having symptoms? I maintain now that sickness might consist of not having symptoms when you should. Does health mean being symptom-free? I deny it. Which of the Nazis at Auschwitz or Dachau were healthy? Those with a stricken conscience or those with a nice, clear, happy conscience? Was it possible for a profoundly human person not to feel conflict, suffering, depression, rage, etc.? In a word if you tell me you have a personality problem, I am not certain until I know you better whether to say "Good" or "I'm sorry". It depends on the reasons. And these, it seems, may be bad reasons, or they may be good reasons. An example is the changing attitude of psychologists toward popularity, toward adjustment, even toward delinquency. Popular with whom? Perhaps it is better for a youngster to be unpopular with the neighboring snobs or with the local country club set. Adjusted to what? To a bad culture? To a dominating parent? What shall we think of a well-adjusted slave? A well-adjusted prisoner? Even the behavior problem boy is being looked upon with new tolerance. Why is he delinquent? Most often it is for sick reasons. But occasionally it is for good reasons and the boy is simply resisting exploitation, domination, neglect, contempt, and trampling upon. Clearly what will be called personality problems depends on who is doing the calling. The slave owner? The dictator? The patriarchal father? The husband who wants his wife to remain a child? It seems quite clear that personality problems may sometimes be loud protests against the crushing of one's psychological bones, of one's true inner nature. "Personality Problems and Personality Growth", an essay in, The Self : Explorations in Personal Growth (1956) by Clark E. Moustakas, p. 237, later published in Notes Toward A Psychology of Being (1962).

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„My Soul gave me good counsel, teaching me to touch what has never taken corporeal form or crystallized.“

—  Khalil Gibran Lebanese artist, poet, and writer 1883 - 1931
Context: My Soul gave me good counsel, teaching me to touch what has never taken corporeal form or crystallized. It made me understand that touching something is half the task of comprehending it, and that what we grasp therein is part of what we desire from it.

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