„A just and reasonable modesty does not only recommend eloquence, but sets off every great talent which a man can be possessed of.“

—  Joseph Addison, No. 231 (24 November 1711).
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Joseph Addison31
1672 - 1719
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„Eloquence may set fire to reason.“

—  Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. United States Supreme Court justice 1841 - 1935
Gitlow v. People of New York, 268 U.S. 652 (1925).

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„The woman who goes to bed with a man must put off her modesty with her petticoat, and put it on again with the same.“

—  Theano (philosopher) Ancient philosopher
From Essay XX by Michel de Montaigne (translated by Charles Cotton, Macmillan London 1877).

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„We hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth, “that Religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator and the Manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence.” The Religion then of every man must be left to the conviction and conscience of every man; and it is the right of every man to exercise it as these may dictate.“

—  James Madison 4th president of the United States (1809 to 1817) 1751 - 1836
Context: We hold it for a fundamental and undeniable truth, “that Religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator and the Manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence.” The Religion then of every man must be left to the conviction and conscience of every man; and it is the right of every man to exercise it as these may dictate. This right is in its nature an unalienable right. It is unalienable; because the opinions of men, depending only on the evidence contemplated by their own minds, cannot follow the dictates of other men: It is unalienable also; because what is here a right towards men, is a duty towards the Creator. It is the duty of every man to render to the Creator such homage, and such only, as he believes to be acceptable to him. This duty is precedent both in order of time and degree of obligation, to the claims of Civil Society. Before any man can be considered as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the Universe: And if a member of Civil Society, who enters into any subordinate Association, must always do it with a reservation of his duty to the general authority; much more must every man who becomes a member of any particular Civil Society, do it with a saving of his allegiance to the Universal Sovereign. We maintain therefore that in matters of Religion, no man’s right is abridged by the institution of Civil Society, and that Religion is wholly exempt from its cognizance. True it is, that no other rule exists, by which any question which may divide a Society, can be ultimately determined, but the will of the majority; but it is also true, that the majority may trespass on the rights of the minority. § 1

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„The passions are the only advocates which always persuade. They are a natural art, the rules of which are infallible; and the simplest man with passion will be more persuasive than the most eloquent without.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld French author of maxims and memoirs 1613 - 1680
Variant translation: The passions are the only orators who always persuade. They are like a natural art, of which the rules are unfailing; and the simplest man who has passion will be more persuasive than the most eloquent man who has none. Maxim 8.

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