„A name made great is a name destroyed. He who does not increase his knowledge decreases it.“

—  Hilel, o Ancião, Pirkei Avot, 1:13
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„He said that there was one only good, namely, knowledge; and one only evil, namely, ignorance.“

—  Diogenes Laërtius biographer of ancient Greek philosophers 180 - 240
The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers (c. 200 A.D.), Book 2: Socrates, his predecessors and followers, Socrates, 14.

Abu Hamid al-Ghazali photo
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„One of the principal reasons that diverts those who are entering upon this knowledge so much from the true path which they should follow, is the fancy that they take at the outset that good things are inaccessible, giving them the name great, lofty, elevated, sublime. This destroys everything. I would call them low, common, familiar“

—  Blaise Pascal French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer, and Christian philosopher 1623 - 1662
The Art of Persuasion, Context: One of the principal reasons that diverts those who are entering upon this knowledge so much from the true path which they should follow, is the fancy that they take at the outset that good things are inaccessible, giving them the name great, lofty, elevated, sublime. This destroys everything. I would call them low, common, familiar: these names suit it better; I hate such inflated expressions.

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Carl Linnaeus photo

„If the names are unknown knowledge of the things also perishes.“

—  Carl Linnaeus, Philosophia Botanica
Philosophia Botanica (1751), aphorism 210. Trans. Frans A. Stafleu, Linnaeus and the Linnaeans: The Spreading of their Ideas in Systematic Botany, 1735-1789 (1971), 80.

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 Maimónides photo
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Muhammad al-Taqi photo

„The one who acts without knowledge, destroys and ruins more than he rectifies.“

—  Muhammad al-Taqi ninth of the Twelve Imams of Twelver Shi'ism 811 - 835
Regarding Knowledge & Wisdom, General, Majlisi, Bihārul Anwār, vol.78, p. 364

Isaiah Berlin photo

„Knowledge increases autonomy both in the sense of Kant, and in that of Spinoza and his followers.“

—  Isaiah Berlin Russo-British Jewish social and political theorist, philosopher and historian of ideas 1909 - 1997
Five Essays on Liberty (2002), From Hope and Fear Set Free (1964), Context: Knowledge increases autonomy both in the sense of Kant, and in that of Spinoza and his followers. I should like to ask once more: is all liberty just that? The advance of knowledge stops men from wasting their resources upon delusive projects. It has stopped us from burning witches or flogging lunatics or predicting the future by listening to oracles or looking at the entrails of animals or the flight of birds. It may yet render many institutions and decisions of the present – legal, political, moral, social – obsolete, by showing them to be as cruel and stupid and incompatible with the pursuit of justice or reason or happiness or truth as we now think the burning of widows or eating the flesh of an enemy to acquire skills. If our powers of prediction, and so our knowledge of the future, become much greater, then, even if they are never complete, this may radically alter our view of what constitutes a person, an act, a choice; and eo ipso our language and our picture of the world. This may make our conduct more rational, perhaps more tolerant, charitable, civilised, it may improve it in many ways, but will it increase the area of free choice? For individuals or groups?

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