„Jesting and levity lead a man to lewdness.“

— Rabi Akiva, Pirkei Avot, 3:17.

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Jimmy Carter photo

„We cannot be both the world's leading champion of peace and the world's leading supplier of the weapons of war.“

— Jimmy Carter American politician, 39th president of the United States (in office from 1977 to 1981) 1924
Context: Sometimes we try to justify this unsavory business on the cynical ground that by rationing out the means of violence we can somehow control the world’s violence. The fact is that we cannot have it both ways. Can we be both the world’s leading champion of peace and the world’s leading supplier of the weapons of war? "A Community of the Free" address at the The Foreign Policy Association NY, NY (23 June 1976); this is often paraphrased: We cannot be both the world’s leading champion of peace and the world’s leading supplier of the weapons of war.

Sun Tzu photo

„A leader leads by example not by force.“

— Sun Tzu ancient Chinese military general, strategist and philosopher from the Zhou Dynasty -543 - 251 a.C.

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Vladimir Lenin photo

„The best way to control the opposition is to lead it ourselves.“

— Vladimir Lenin Russian politician, led the October Revolution 1870 - 1924

Jesse Owens photo

„The road to the Olympics, leads to no city, no country. It goes far beyond New York or Moscow, ancient Greece or Nazi Germany. The road to the Olympics leads — in the end — to the best within us.“

— Jesse Owens American track and field athlete 1913 - 1980
As quoted in People In America : "Jesse Owens" by Barbara Dash http://web.archive.org/web/20071219045105/http://voanews.com/specialenglish/archive/2002-06/a-2002-06-07-2-1.cfm on VOA (7 June 2002)

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C.G. Jung photo

„Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.“

— C.G. Jung Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology 1875 - 1961
Context: We always require an outside point to stand on, in order to apply the lever of criticism. This is especially so in psychology, where by the nature of the material we are much more subjectively involved than in any other science. How, for example, can we become conscious of national peculiarities if we have never had the opportunity to regard our own nation from outside? Regarding it from outside means regarding it from the standpoint of another nation. To do so, we must acquire sufficient knowledge of the foreign collective psyche, and in the course of this process of assimilation we encounter all those incompatibilities which constitute the national bias and the national peculiarity. Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves. I understand England only when I see where I, as a Swiss, do not fit in. I understand Europe, our greatest problem, only when I see where I as a European do not fit into the world. Through my acquaintance with many Americans, and my trips to and in America, I have obtained an enormous amount of insight into the European character; it has always seemed to me that there can be nothing more useful for a European than some time or another to look out at Europe from the top of a skyscraper. When I contemplated for the first time the European spectacle from the Sahara, surrounded by a civilization which has more or less the same relationship to ours as Roman antiquity has to modem times, I became aware of how completely, even in America, I was still caught up and imprisoned in the cultural consciousness of the white man. The desire then grew in me to carry the historical comparisons still farther by descending to a still lower cultural level. On my next trip to the United States I went with a group of American friends to visit the Indians of New Mexico, the city-building Pueblos... ii. America: The Pueblo Indians http://books.google.com/books?id=w6vUgN16x6EC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Jung+Memories+Dreams+and+Reflections&hl=en&sa=X&ei=LLxKUcD0NfSo4APh0oDABg&ved=0CDAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false (Extract from an unpublished ms) (Random House Digital, 2011).

 Aristotle photo

„To lead an orchestra, you must turn your back on the crowd“

—  Aristotle Classical Greek philosopher, student of Plato and founder of Western philosophy -384 - -322 a.C.

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John Muir photo

„Between every two pine trees there is a door leading to a new way of life.“

— John Muir Scottish-born American naturalist and author 1838 - 1914
Muir's marginal note in volume I of Prose Works by Ralph Waldo Emerson (This volume is located at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Yale University. See Albert Saijo, "Me, Muir, and Sierra Nevada", in Reinhabiting a Separate Country: A Bioregional Anthology of Northern California, edited by Peter Berg, San Francisco, California: Planet Drum Foundation, 1978, pages 52-59, at page 55, and Frederick W. Turner, Rediscovering America: John Muir in His Time and Ours (1985), page 193.)

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Ian Fleming photo

„Never say ‘no’ to adventures. Always say ‘yes’, otherwise you’ll lead a very dull life.“

— Ian Fleming English author, journalist and naval intelligence officer 1908 - 1964
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Liam Payne photo

„Dreams are like stars; you may never touch them, but if you follow them, they will lead you to your destiny.“

— Liam Payne English singer and songwriter 1993
https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/6422617.Liam_Payne

Pablo Picasso photo

„Every positive value has its price in negative terms... the genius of Einstein leads to Hiroshima.“

— Pablo Picasso Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, and stage designer 1881 - 1973

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