„When swept out of its normal channel, life scatters into innumerable streams. It is difficult to foresee which it will take in its treacherous and winding course. Where to-day it flows in shallows, like a rivulet over sandbanks, so shallow that the shoals are visible, to-morrow it will flow richly and fully.“

—  Mikhail Sholokhov, livro And Quiet Flows the Don, And Quiet Flows the Don (1934)
Mikhail Sholokhov photo
Mikhail Sholokhov
1905 - 1984

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—  Thomas Mann German novelist, and 1929 Nobel Prize laureate 1875 - 1955
Freud and the Future (1937), Context: The myth is the foundation of life; it is the timeless schema, the pious formula into which life flows when it reproduces its traits out of the unconscious. Certainly when a writer has acquired the habit of regarding life as mythical and typical there comes a curious heightening of his artistic temper, a new refreshment to his perceiving and shaping powers, which otherwise occurs much later in life; for while in the life of the human race the mythical is an early and primitive stage, in the life of the individual it is a late and mature one.

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„Life is flowing away like water running out from a leaky vessel.“

—  Bhartrihari Indian linguist, poet and writer 570
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„To live only for some future goal is shallow. It’s the sides of the mountain that sustain life, not the top. Here's where things grow.“

—  Robert M. Pirsig, livro Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974), Context: Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. The reality of your own nature should determine the speed. If you become restless, speed up. If you become winded, slow down. You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion. Then, when you are no longer thinking ahead, each footstep isn't just a means to an an end but a unique event in itself. This leaf has jagged edges. This rock looks loose. From this place the snow is less visible, even though closer. These are things you should notice anyway. To live only for some future goal is shallow. It’s the sides of the mountain that sustain life, not the top. Here's where things grow. <!-- p. 205 Ch. 17

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