„Seven hours to law, to soothing slumber seven,
Ten to the world allot, and all to heaven.“

—  William Jones, Reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919) Compare: "Six hours in sleep, in law's grave study six, Four spend in prayer, the rest on Nature fix", Translation of lines quoted by Edward Coke.
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William Jones
1746 - 1794
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