„Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.“

—  Sealth
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Sealth2
1786 - 1866
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—  Marie Curie French-Polish physicist and chemist 1867 - 1934
'La vie n’est facile pour aucun de nous. Mais quoi, il faut avoir de la persévérance, et surtout de la confiance en soi. Il faut croire que l’on est doué pour quelque chose, et que, cette chose, il faut l'atteindre coûte que coûte.' As quoted in Madame Curie : A Biography (1937) by Eve Curie Labouisse, Part 2, p. 116

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„Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners.“

—  Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own
Context: Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible; Shakespeare's plays, for instance, seem to hang there complete by themselves. But when the web is pulled askew, hooked up at the edge, torn in the middle, one remembers that these webs are not spun in midair by incorporeal creatures, but are the work of suffering human beings, and are attached to the grossly material things, like health and money and the houses we live in. Ch. 3, pp. 43-44

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