„Nevertheless, this individual aspect [just-so-ness] of number appears to contain the mysterious factor that enables it to organize psyche and matter jointly.“

—  Marie-Louise von Franz, Number and Time (1974), p. p60-61
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„The wonder is not that so much cacophony appears in our actual individual lives, but that there is any appearance of harmony and progression.“

—  Lewis Mumford American historian, sociologist, philosopher of technology, and literary critic 1895 - 1990
The Conduct Of Life (1951), Context: Now life is the only art that we are required to practice without preparation, and without being allowed the preliminary trials, the failures and botches, that are essential for the training of a mere beginner. In life, we must begin to give a public performance before we have acquired even a novice's skill; and often our moments of seeming mastery are upset by new demands, for which we have acquired no preparatory facility. Life is a score that we play at sight, not merely before we have divined the intentions of the composer, but even before we have mastered our instruments; even worse, a large part of the score has been only roughly indicated, and we must improvise the music for our particular instrument, over long passages. On these terms, the whole operation seems one of endless difficulty and frustration; and indeed, were it not for the fact that some of the passages have been played so often by our predecessors that, when we come to them, we seem to recall some of the score and can anticipate the natural sequence of the notes, we might often give up in sheer despair. The wonder is not that so much cacophony appears in our actual individual lives, but that there is any appearance of harmony and progression.

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„I will not accept boundaries; appearances cannot contain me“

—  Nikos Kazantzakis, livro The Saviors of God
The Saviors of God (1923), Context: I will not accept boundaries; appearances cannot contain me; I choke! To bleed in this agony, and to live it profoundly, is the second duty. The mind is patient and adjusts itself, it likes to play; but the heart grows savage and will not condescend to play; it stifles and rushes to tear apart the nets of necessity.

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„Every object that we perceive appears in innumerable aspects. The concept of the object is the invariant of all these aspects.“

—  Max Born physicist 1882 - 1970
Context: Can we call something with which the concepts of position and motion cannot be associated in the usual way, a thing, or a particle? And if not, what is the reality which our theory has been invented to describe? The answer to this is no longer physics, but philosophy. … Here I will only say that I am emphatically in favour of the retention of the particle idea. Naturally, it is necessary to redefine what is meant. For this, well-developed concepts are available which appear in mathematics under the name of invariants in transformations. Every object that we perceive appears in innumerable aspects. The concept of the object is the invariant of all these aspects. From this point of view, the present universally used system of concepts in which particles and waves appear simultaneously, can be completely justified. The latest research on nuclei and elementary particles has led us, however, to limits beyond which this system of concepts itself does not appear to suffice. The lesson to be learned from what I have told of the origin of quantum mechanics is that probable refinements of mathematical methods will not suffice to produce a satisfactory theory, but that somewhere in our doctrine is hidden a concept, unjustified by experience, which we must eliminate to open up the road. The close of his Nobel lecture: "The Statistical Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics" (11 December 1954) http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1954/born-lecture.html

„Each time dawn appears, the mystery is there in its entirety.“

—  René Daumal French poet and writer 1908 - 1944
“Poetry Black, Poetry White,” no. 19-20, Fontaine (Paris, March/April 1942)

„The sudden appearance of novelty is not, as Otto Schindewolf emphasized, an unusual aspect of the fossil record.“

—  Jeffrey H. Schwartz American anthropologist 1948
Sudden Origins: Fossils, Genes, and the Emergence of Species (1999), p, 125

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