„Man must be so weighed as though there were a God within him.“

—  Marcus Manilius, Astronomica, Astronomica, Impendendus homo est, deus esse ut possit in ipso. Book IV, line 407.
Original

Impendendus homo est, deus esse ut possit in ipso.

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