„123. Happy is the monk who considers all men as god — after God.“

Chapters on Prayer

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História

Citações relacionadas

Evagrius Ponticus photo
Evagrius Ponticus photo
Fyodor Dostoyevsky photo
Abraham Lincoln photo

„God created all men free, giving to each the same rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

In Richmond, Virginia (April 4, 1865), as quoted in Recollected Words of Abraham Lincoln http://web.archive.org/web/20130517052731/http://mrlincolnandfreedom.org/inside.asp?ID=84&subjectID=3 (1996), by Don Edward Fehrenbacher and Virginia Fehrenbacher, editor, p. 257
1860s, Tour of Richmond (1865)
Contexto: In reference to you, colored people, let me say God has made you free. Although you have been deprived of your God-given rights by your so-called masters, you are now as free as I am, and if those that claim to be your superiors do not know that you are free, take the sword and bayonet and teach them that you are; for God created all men free, giving to each the same rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Hesiod photo

„The deathless gods are near among men and mark all those who oppress their fellows with crooked judgements, and reck not the anger of the gods.“

—  Hesiod, livro Works and Days

Original: (el) Ἐγγὺς γὰρ ἐν ἀνθρώποισιν ἐόντες
ἀθάνατοι φράζονται, ὅσοι σκολιῇσι δίκῃσιν
ἀλλήλους τρίβουσι θεῶν ὄπιν οὐκ ἀλέγοντες.
Fonte: Works and Days (c. 700 BC), line 249.

Thomas Arnold photo
Homér photo

„See now, how men lay blame upon us gods for what is after all nothing but their own folly.“

—  Homér, The Odyssey (Cowper)

I. 32–34 (tr. Samuel Butler).
Odyssey (c. 725 BC)
Original: (el) ὢ πόποι, οἷον δή νυ θεοὺς βροτοὶ αἰτιόωνται.
ἐξ ἡμέων γάρ φασι κάκ' ἔμμεναι· οἱ δὲ καὶ αὐτοὶ
σφῇσιν ἀτασθαλίῃσιν ὑπὲρ μόρον ἄλγε' ἔχουσιν.

Hesiod photo

„Love, who is most beautiful among the immortal gods, the melter of limbs, overwhelms in their hearts the intelligence and wise counsel of all gods and all men.“

—  Hesiod Greek poet

Original: (el) Ἠδ᾽ Ἔρος, ὃς κάλλιστος ἐν ἀθανάτοισι θεοῖσι,
λυσιμελής, πάντων δὲ θεῶν πάντων τ᾽ ἀνθρώπων
δάμναται ἐν στήθεσσι νόον καὶ ἐπίφρονα βουλήν.
Fonte: The Theogony (c. 700 BC), line 120.

Aron Ra photo
Homér photo

„All men need the gods…“

—  Homér, The Odyssey (Cowper)

III. 48 (tr. Robert Fagles).
Odyssey (c. 725 BC)
Original: (el) Πάντες δὲ θεῶν χατέουσ' ἄνθρωποι.

James Hudson Taylor photo

„All God’s giants have been weak men, who did great things for God because they reckoned on His being with them.“

—  James Hudson Taylor Missionary in China 1832 - 1905

(Hudson Taylor’s Choice Sayings: A Compilation from His Writings and Addresses. London: China Inland Mission, n.d., 29).
Variante: All God’s giants have been weak men, who did great things for God because they reckoned on His being with them.

George Meredith photo

„God's rarest blessing is, after all, a good woman!“

—  George Meredith British novelist and poet of the Victorian era 1828 - 1909

Fonte: The Ordeal of Richard Feverel http://www.gutenberg.org/files/4412/4412.txt (1859), Ch. 33.

Brother Yun photo

„It is not great men who change the world, but weak men in the hands of a great God.“

—  Brother Yun Chinese christian house church leader 1958

Fonte: The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun

Margaret Cho photo
Saint Patrick photo

„Therefore be amazed, you great and small who fear God, and you men of God, eloquent speakers, listen and contemplate.“

—  Saint Patrick 5th-century Romano-British Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland 385 - 461

The Confession (c. 452?)
Contexto: Therefore be amazed, you great and small who fear God, and you men of God, eloquent speakers, listen and contemplate. Who was it summoned me, a fool, from the midst of those who appear wise and learned in the law and powerful in rhetoric and in all things? Me, truly wretched in this world, he inspired before others that I could be — if I would — such a one who, with fear and reverence, and faithfully, without complaint, would come to the people to whom the love of Christ brought me and gave me in my lifetime, if I should be worthy, to serve them truly and with humility.

Sophocles photo
Thomas Paine photo

„To God, and not to man, are all men to account for their belief.“

—  Thomas Paine English and American political activist 1737 - 1809

1790s, Discourse to the Theophilanthropists (1798)
Contexto: It was the excess to which imaginary systems of religion had been carried, and the intolerance, persecutions, burnings, and massacres, they occasioned, that first induced certain persons to propagate infidelity; thinking, that upon the whole, that it was better not to believe at all, than to believe a multitude of things and complicated creeds, that occasioned so much mischief in the world. But those days are past, persecution has ceased, and the antidote then set up against it has no longer even the shadow of apology. We profess, and we proclaim in peace, the pure, unmixed, comfortable, and rational belief of a God, as manifested to us in the universe. We do this without any apprehension of that belief being made a cause of persecution as other beliefs have been, or of suffering persecution ourselves. To God, and not to man, are all men to account for their belief.