„I think mutual denial of each other’s sovereignty (between ROC and PRC) and mutual non-denial of respective jurisdictions would be more appropriate, but any proposal has its pros and cons, and I think it’s up for discussion.“

—  Ma Ying-jeou, Ma Ying-jeou (2011) cited in: " ‘One China’ idea up for discussion: Ma http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/front/archives/2011/06/25/2003506626" in The Taipei Times, 25 June 2011. Statement made during the interview with Apple Daily, 24 June 2011.
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—  Donald Judd artist 1928 - 1994
Context: I think most of the art now is involved with a denial of any kind of absolute morality, or general morality. I think most of us in one way or another are involved in ideas of a fairly loose world, however it's expressed, whether obviously as in Chamberlain or just accidentally, or, oh, like Newman.

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„Never think that God's delays are God's denials. Hold on; hold fast; hold out. Patience is genius.“

—  Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon French natural historian 1707 - 1788
As quoted in New Cyclopædia of Illustrations (1870) by Elon Foster, p. 492

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„I still get heartbreak fan mail. I think fans who send them are in denial. They are unable to accept that I am married now. And, yes, I enjoy it (laughs).“

—  Shreya Ghoshal Indian playback singer 1984
Male fans rections about Ghoshal's marriage http://www.mid-day.com/articles/singer-shreya-ghoshal-rubbishes-pregnancy-rumours-bollywood-news/17710170

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„In America, the powers of sovereignty are divided between the Government of the Union and those of the States. They are each sovereign with respect to the objects committed to it, and neither sovereign with respect to the objects committed to the other. We cannot comprehend that train of reasoning, which would maintain that the extent of power granted by the people is to be ascertained not by the nature and terms of the grant, but by its date. Some State Constitutions were formed before, some since, that of the United States. We cannot believe that their relation to each other is in any degree dependent upon this circumstance. Their respective powers must, we think, be precisely the same as if they had been formed at the same time.“

—  John Marshall fourth Chief Justice of the United States 1755 - 1835
Context: In America, the powers of sovereignty are divided between the Government of the Union and those of the States. They are each sovereign with respect to the objects committed to it, and neither sovereign with respect to the objects committed to the other. We cannot comprehend that train of reasoning, which would maintain that the extent of power granted by the people is to be ascertained not by the nature and terms of the grant, but by its date. Some State Constitutions were formed before, some since, that of the United States. We cannot believe that their relation to each other is in any degree dependent upon this circumstance. Their respective powers must, we think, be precisely the same as if they had been formed at the same time. Had they been formed at the same time, and had the people conferred on the General Government the power contained in the Constitution, and on the States the whole residuum of power, would it have been asserted that the Government of the Union was not sovereign, with respect to those objects which were intrusted to it, in relation to which its laws were declared to be supreme? If this could not have been asserted, we cannot well comprehend the process of reasoning which maintains that a power appertaining to sovereignty cannot be connected with that vast portion of it which is granted to the General Government, so far as it is calculated to subserve the legitimate objects of that Government. 17 U.S. (4 Wheaton) 316, 411-412

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„To say more than what's necessary
I don't think is appropriate for a man.“

—  Menander Athenian playwright of New Comedy -342 - -291 a.C.
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