„Labor is itself a pleasure.“

—  Marcus Manilius, Astronomica, Labor est etiam ipse voluptas. Variant translation (reading ipsa): Even pleasure itself is a toil. Book IV, line 155. Explained by Housman ad loc. The first reading is the correct one in the context.
Original

Labor est etiam ipse voluptas.

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