„It is of the essence of imaginative culture that is transcends the limits both of the naturally possible and of the morally acceptable.“

"Quotes", Anatomy of Criticism: Four Essays (1957), Anagogic Phase: Symbol as Monad

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Northrop Frye photo
Northrop Frye4
1912 - 1991

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Frank Herbert photo

„If we define Futurism as an exploration beyond accepted limits, then the nature of limiting systems becomes the first object of exploration.“

—  Frank Herbert American writer 1920 - 1986

"Doll Factory, Gun Factory" (1973), essay reprinted in The Maker of Dune : Insights of a Master of Science Fiction (1987), edited by Tim O'Reilly
General sources

Brian Tracy photo
Piet Mondrian photo
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Nayef Al-Rodhan photo
Sri Aurobindo photo

„A one transcendent, universal, original and sempiternal Divinity or divine Essence, Consciousness, Force and Bliss is the fount and continent and inhabitant of things.
Soul, nature, life are only a manifestation or partial phenomenon of this self-aware Eternity and this conscious Eternal.“

—  Sri Aurobindo Indian nationalist, freedom fighter, philosopher, yogi, guru and poet 1872 - 1950

Indian Spirituality and Life (1919)
Contexto: The fundamental idea of all Indian religion is one common to the highest human thinking everywhere. The supreme truth of all that is is a Being or an existence beyond the mental and physical appearances we contact here. Beyond mind, life and body there is a Spirit and Self containing all that is finite and infinite, surpassing all that is relative, a supreme Absolute, originating and supporting all that is transient, a one Eternal. A one transcendent, universal, original and sempiternal Divinity or divine Essence, Consciousness, Force and Bliss is the fount and continent and inhabitant of things.
Soul, nature, life are only a manifestation or partial phenomenon of this self-aware Eternity and this conscious Eternal.

Zisi photo

„What is God-given is what we call human nature. To fulfil the law of our human nature is what we call the moral law. The cultivation of the moral law is what we call culture.“

—  Zisi Chinese philosopher -481 - -402 a.C.

Opening lines, p. 104
Variant translations:
What is God-given is called nature; to follow nature is called Tao (the Way); to cultivate the Way is called culture.
As translated by Lin Yutang in The Importance of Living (1937), p. 143
What is God-given is called human nature.
To fulfill that nature is called the moral law (Tao).
The cultivation of the moral law is called culture.
As translated by Lin Yutang in From Pagan to Christian (1959), p. 85
The Doctrine of the Mean

Susan Sontag photo
Nayef Al-Rodhan photo
Stanisław Lem photo
Northrop Frye photo

„But in the imagination anything goes that can be imagined, and the limit of the imagination is a totally human world.“

—  Northrop Frye Canadian literary critic and literary theorist 1912 - 1991

"Quotes", The Educated Imagination (1963), Talk 1: The Motive For Metaphor http://northropfrye-theeducatedimagination.blogspot.ca/2009/08/1-motive-for-metaphor.html
Contexto: At the level of ordinary consciousness the individual man is the centre of everything, surrounded on all sides by what he isn't. At the level of practical sense, or civilization, there's a human circumference, a little cultivated world with a human shape, fenced off from the jungle and inside the sea and the sky. But in the imagination anything goes that can be imagined, and the limit of the imagination is a totally human world.

Wilhelm Lehmbruck photo

„Sculpture is the essence of things, the essence of nature, that which is perpetually human.“

—  Wilhelm Lehmbruck German sculptor 1881 - 1919

As quoted in Expressionism (2004) by Norbert Wolf and Uta Grosenick, p. 64

George Orwell photo

„Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

"Notes on Nationalism" (1945)
Contexto: By "nationalism" I mean first of all the habit of assuming that human beings can be classified like insects and that whole blocks of millions or tens of millions of people can be confidently labelled "good" or "bad." But secondly — and this is much more important — I mean the habit of identifying oneself with a single nation or other unit, placing it beyond good and evil and recognizing no other duty than that of advancing its interests. Nationalism is not to be confused with patriotism. Both words are normally used in so vague a way that any definition is liable to be challenged, but one must draw a distinction between them, since two different and even opposing ideas are involved. By "patriotism" I mean devotion to a particular place and a particular way of life, which one believes to be the best in the world but has no wish to force on other people. Patriotism is of its nature defensive, both militarily and culturally. Nationalism, on the other hand, is inseparable from the desire for power. The abiding purpose of every nationalist is to secure more power and more prestige, not for himself but for the nation or other unit in which he has chosen to sink his own individuality.

Edmund Burke photo

„There is nothing that God has judged good for us that He has not given us the means to accomplish, both in the natural and the moral world.“

—  Edmund Burke Anglo-Irish statesman 1729 - 1797

Reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 261
Undated

„How fortunate is this generation to live at a time when the sources of our culture—sacred and profane—are illuminated in a brighter light of history than our forefathers imagined possible!“

—  Cyrus H. Gordon American linguist 1908 - 2001

Introduction
Adventures in the Nearest East (1957)
Contexto: While Ugarit is revolutionizing the problem of Old Testament origins, the Dead Sea scrolls are doing the same for the New Testament. How fortunate is this generation to live at a time when the sources of our culture—sacred and profane—are illuminated in a brighter light of history than our forefathers imagined possible!

Erin McKean photo

„PHILOSOPHY essential nature or essence.“

—  Erin McKean Lexicographer, dictionary editor 1971

The New Oxford American Dictionary

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Ronald Reagan photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“