„Lord of himself, though not of lands;
And having nothing, yet hath all.“

—  Henry Wotton, The Character of a Happy Life (1614), stanza 6. Compare: "As having nothing, and yet possessing all things", 2 Corinthians vi. 10.
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Henry Wotton1
1568 - 1639
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„The Lord celestial
Hath given enough wherewith to please us all.“

—  Francois Rabelais major French Renaissance writer 1494 - 1553
Context: Alluring, courtly, comely, fine, complete, Wise, personable, ravishing, and sweet, Come joys enjoy. The Lord celestial Hath given enough wherewith to please us all. Chapter 54 : The inscription set upon the great gate of Theleme.

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„And the might of the Gentile, unsmote by the sword,
Hath melted like snow in the glance of the Lord!“

—  George Gordon Byron English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement 1788 - 1824
The Destruction of Sennacherib, st. 6.

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„In this stage the Lord leads a person out of himself into himself“

—  Johannes Tauler German theologian 1300 - 1361
Context: When our Lord has prepared a person in this unbearable state of misery - for this prepares him much better than all the spiritual practices that all people might be able to accomplish - then our Lord comes and leads him to the third stage. In this stage the Lord removes the cloak from his eyes and reveals the truth to him. Bright sunshine appears and lifts him right out of all his misery. It seems to this person just as though the Lord had raised him from the dead. In this stage the Lord leads a person out of himself into himself. He makes him forget all his former loneliness and heals all his wounds. God How can reason possibly grasp that immensity beyond all being where the precious food of the Eucharist is made one with us, drawing us wholly to itself and changing us into itself?... This food of love draws the soul above distinction or difference, beyond resemblance to divine unity draws the person out of his human mode into a divine mode, out of all misery into divine security. Here a person becomes so divinized that everything he is and does God does and is in him. And he is lifted up so far above his natural state that he becomes through Grace what God in his essence is by nature. In this state a person feels and is aware that he has lost himself and does not at all feel himself or is he aware of himself. He is aware of nothing but one simple Being.

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„In God there may be no wrath, as to my sight: for our good Lord endlessly hath regard to His own worship and to the profit of all that shall be saved.“

—  Julian of Norwich English theologian and anchoress 1342 - 1416
Context: In God there may be no wrath, as to my sight: for our good Lord endlessly hath regard to His own worship and to the profit of all that shall be saved. With might and right He withstandeth the Reproved, the which of malice and wickedness busy them to contrive and to do against God’s will. Also I saw our Lord scorn his malice and set at nought his unmight; and He willeth that we do so. For this sight I laughed mightily, and that made them to laugh that were about me, and their laughing was a pleasure to me.