„Only when we let go of attachment can we let go of the self. Free ourselves from worries. If we are constantly troubled by worries, it must be that we think too highly of ourselves.“

Quotes from Word of Wisdoms Vol.3
Original: (zh_Hant) 放下執著,才能破除我執。 我們做人不能有煩惱, 有煩惱的人一定是把自己 看得太大、太高了。

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Jun Hong Lu26
Australian Buddhist leader 1959

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