„What seems to emerge is not a moral reprimand of the management scientist, but rather a moral problem of the profession, a wicked moral problem.“

Fonte: 1960s - 1970s, Guest editorial: Wicked problems (1967), p. 142 cited in: Rob Hundman (2010) Weerbarstig veranderen. p. 38

Citações relacionadas

Saul D. Alinsky photo

„Those who are most moral are farthest from the problem.“

—  Saul D. Alinsky American community organizer and writer 1909 - 1972

Fonte: Rules for Radicals: A Pragmatic Primer for Realistic Radicals

Roger Scruton photo

„In argument about moral problems, relativism is the first refuge of the scoundrel.“

—  Roger Scruton English philosopher 1944 - 2020

"Some More -isms" (p. 32)
Modern Philosophy (1995)

Margaret Sanger photo
Dorothy Day photo

„For some weeks now my problem is this: What to do about the open immorality (and of course I mean sexual morality) in our midst.“

—  Dorothy Day Social activist 1897 - 1980

26 June 1971
The Duty of Delight (2011)
Contexto: For some weeks now my problem is this: What to do about the open immorality (and of course I mean sexual morality) in our midst. It is like the last times--there is nothing hidden that shall not be revealed.... We have one young [prostitute], drunken, promiscuous, pretty as a picture, college educated, mischievous, able to talk her way out of any situation--so far. She comes to us when she is drunk and beaten and hungry and cold and when she is taken in, she is liable to crawl into the bed of any man on the place. We do not know how many she has slept with on the farm. What to do? What to do?

Robert F. Kennedy photo

„It is not realistic or hardheaded to solve problems and take action unguided by ultimate moral aims and values“

—  Robert F. Kennedy American politician and brother of John F. Kennedy 1925 - 1968

Day of Affirmation Address (1966)
Contexto: The second danger is that of expediency: of those who say that hopes and beliefs must bend before immediate necessities. Of course, if we must act effectively we must deal with the world as it is. We must get things done. But if there was one thing that President Kennedy stood for that touched the most profound feeling of young people around the world, it was the belief that idealism, high aspirations, and deep convictions are not incompatible with the most practical and efficient of programs — that there is no basic inconsistency between ideals and realistic possibilities, no separation between the deepest desires of heart and of mind and the rational application of human effort to human problems. It is not realistic or hardheaded to solve problems and take action unguided by ultimate moral aims and values, although we all know some who claim that it is so. In my judgment, it is thoughtless folly. For it ignores the realities of human faith and of passion and of belief — forces ultimately more powerful than all of the calculations of our economists or of our generals. Of course to adhere to standards, to idealism, to vision in the face of immediate dangers takes great courage and takes self-confidence. But we also know that only those who dare to fail greatly, can ever achieve greatly.

Robert A. Heinlein photo
Colin Wilson photo

„In fact, the real problem with the thesis of A Genealogy of Morals is that the noble and the aristocrat are just as likely to be stupid as the plebeian.“

—  Colin Wilson author 1931 - 2013

I had noted in my teens that major writers are usually those who have had to struggle against the odds -- to "pull their cart out of the mud," as I put it -- while writers who have had an easy start in life are usually second rate -- or at least, not quite first-rate. Dickens, Balzac, Dostoevsky, Shaw, H. G. Wells, are examples of the first kind; in the twentieth century, John Galsworthy, Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh, and Samuel Beckett are examples of the second kind. They are far from being mediocre writers; yet they tend to be tinged with a certain pessimism that arises from never having achieved a certain resistance against problems.
Fonte: The Books in My Life (1998), p. 188

James Joyce photo
Kenneth Minogue photo
William Barber II photo

„It was the Civil Rights Movement that said we don’t need to just pray for things to get better in America, we need to march in the street and challenge the injustices of society and declare that segregation was not only a political problem, but a moral problem.“

—  William Barber II civil rights leader from North Carolina 1963

William J. Barber II calls for a moral America, Street Roots News, by Christen McCurdy,(8 Nov 2019), Full text https://news.streetroots.org/2019/11/08/william-j-barber-ii-calls-moral-america

Albert Einstein photo

„I believe that we have to content ourselves with our imperfect knowledge and understanding and treat values and moral obligations as a purely human problem—the most important of all human problems.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

Attributed in posthumous publications
Contexto: It seems to me that the idea of a personal God is an anthropomorphic concept which I cannot take seriously. I feel also not able to imagine some will or goal outside the human sphere. My views are near to those of Spinoza: admiration for the beauty of and belief in the logical simplicity of the order and harmony which we can grasp humbly and only imperfectly. I believe that we have to content ourselves with our imperfect knowledge and understanding and treat values and moral obligations as a purely human problem—the most important of all human problems.

From a letter to Murray W. Gross (26 April 1947), p. 138

Theodore Dalrymple photo
Milton Friedman photo

„It's a moral problem that the government is making into criminals people, who may be doing something you and I don't approve of, but who are doing something that hurts nobody else.“

—  Milton Friedman American economist, statistician, and writer 1912 - 2006

America's Drug Forum interview (1991)
Contexto: It's a moral problem that the government is making into criminals people, who may be doing something you and I don't approve of, but who are doing something that hurts nobody else. Most of the arrests for drugs are for possession by casual users.
Now here's somebody who wants to smoke a marijuana cigarette. If he's caught, he goes to jail. Now is that moral? Is that proper? I think it's absolutely disgraceful that our government, supposed to be our government, should be in the position of converting people who are not harming others into criminals, of destroying their lives, putting them in jail. That's the issue to me. The economic issue comes in only for explaining why it has those effects. But the economic reasons are not the reasons.

Winston S. Churchill photo

„The contrast between the morals at the centre of power and those practiced by wide communities in many subject lands presented problems of ever growing unrest.“

—  Winston S. Churchill, livro A History of the English-Speaking Peoples

On the last years of Rome and Roman Britain; Vol I; The Birth of Britain.
A History of the English-Speaking Peoples (1956–58)

Robert Chambers (publisher, born 1802) photo

„This statistical regularity in moral affairs fully establishes their being under the presidency of law. Man is now seen to be an enigma only as an individual; in the mass he is a mathematical problem.“

—  Robert Chambers (publisher, born 1802), livro Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation

Fonte: Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (1844), p. 170-171 ( 1846 edition http://books.google.com/books?id=UkoWAAAAYAAJ)
Contexto: This statistical regularity in moral affairs fully establishes their being under the presidency of law. Man is now seen to be an enigma only as an individual; in the mass he is a mathematical problem. It is hardly necessary to say, much less to argue, that mental action, being proved to be under law, passes at once into the category of natural things. Its old metaphysical character vanishes in a moment, and the distinction usually taken between physical and moral is annulled, as only an error in terms. This view agrees with what all observation teaches, that mental phenomena flow directly from the brain.

C. Wright Mills photo
W. Edwards Deming photo

„The worker is not the problem. The problem is at the top! Management!“

—  W. Edwards Deming American professor, author, and consultant 1900 - 1993

Cultural Transformation Study Guide http://forecast.umkc.edu/ftppub/ba541/DEMINGLIBRARY/DLVol24-25.PDF Accessed December 19, 2006

Philip B. Crosby photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“