„The League is dead; long live the United Nations!“

—  Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood, Last speech before the League of Nations (8 April 1946)
Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood photo
Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood30
lawyer, politician and diplomat in the United Kingdom 1864 - 1958
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Li Minqi photo

„The Revolution is dead. Long Live the Revolution“

—  Li Minqi Chinese economist 1969
Chapter Two, "Accumulation, Basic Needs, and Class Struggle: the Rise of Modern China"

Ernest Hemingway photo
Publicidade
George Grosz photo

„Árt is dead. Long live Tatlin's new machine art.“

—  George Grosz German artist 1893 - 1959
Quote of Grosz and Heartfield, 1920: text on their billboard at the Dada fair in Berlin

Su Shi photo

„For ten long years the living of the dead knows nought.
Though to my mind not brought,
Could the dead be forgot?“

—  Su Shi Chinese writer 1037 - 1101
"Dreaming of My Deceased Wife on the Night of the Twentieth Day of the First Month" (《江城子·乙卯正月二十日夜记梦》), in Song of the Immortals: An Anthology of Classical Chinese Poetry, trans. Yuanchong Xu (Beijing: New World Press, 1994), p. 202

Boutros Boutros-Ghali photo

„Since the creation of the United Nations in 1945, over 100 major conflicts around the world have left some 20 million dead.“

—  Boutros Boutros-Ghali 6th Secretary-General of the United Nations 1922 - 2016
In a speech in 1992. Cited in Awake! magazine, 1995, 9/8; article: How Was the World 50 Years Ago?

Pope John XXIII photo

„We are not on earth as museum keepers, but to cultivate a flourishing garden of life and to prepare a glorious future. The Pope is dead. Long live the Pope!“

—  Pope John XXIII 261st Pope of the Catholic Church 1881 - 1963
Context: One of my favorite phrases that brings me great comfort: We are not on earth as museum keepers, but to cultivate a flourishing garden of life and to prepare a glorious future. The Pope is dead. Long live the Pope! Journal entry on the day Pope Pius XII died (9 October 1958); published in Journal of a Soul (1965)

Christopher Paolini photo
Publicidade
Richelle Mead photo
Clarice Lispector photo
Henri Barbusse photo

„The dead are specters of the living, but the living are specters of the dead.“

—  Henri Barbusse French novelist 1873 - 1935
Context: I am not in pain. I am extraordinarily calm; I am drunk with tranquillity. Are they dead, all — those? I do not know. The dead are specters of the living, but the living are specters of the dead. Something warm is licking my hand. The black mass which overhangs me is trembling. It is a foundered horse, whose great body is emptying itself, whose blood is flowing like poor touches of a tongue on to my hand.

Michel De Montaigne photo

„Live as long as you please, you will strike nothing off the time you will have to spend dead.“

—  Michel De Montaigne (1533-1592) French-Occitan author, humanistic philosopher, statesman 1533 - 1592
Book I, Ch. 20

Publicidade
Drew Karpyshyn photo
John F. Kennedy photo

„We meet in an hour of grief and challenge. Dag Hammarskjold is dead. But the United Nations lives. His tragedy is deep in our hearts, but the task for which he died is at the top of our agenda. A noble servant of peace is gone. But the quest for peace lies before us.“

—  John F. Kennedy 35th president of the United States of America 1917 - 1963
Context: We meet in an hour of grief and challenge. Dag Hammarskjold is dead. But the United Nations lives. His tragedy is deep in our hearts, but the task for which he died is at the top of our agenda. A noble servant of peace is gone. But the quest for peace lies before us. The problem is not the death of one man — the problem is the life of this organization. It will either grow to meet the challenges of our age, or it will be gone with the wind, without influence, without force, without respect. Were we to let it die, to enfeeble its vigor, to cripple its powers, we would condemn our future. For in the development of this organization rests the only true alternative to war — and war appeals no longer as a rational alternative. Unconditional war can no longer lead to unconditional victory. It can no longer serve to settle disputes. It can no longer concern the great powers alone. For a nuclear disaster, spread by wind and water and fear, could well engulf the great and the small, the rich and the poor, the committed and the uncommitted alike. Mankind must put an end to war — or war will put an end to mankind. So let us here resolve that Dag Hammarskjold did not live, or die, in vain. Let us call a truce to terror. Let us invoke the blessings of peace. And as we build an international capacity to keep peace, let us join in dismantling the national capacity to wage war.

Annie Besant photo

„The body is never more alive than when it is dead; but it is alive in its units, and dead in its totality; alive as a congeries, dead as an organism.“

—  Annie Besant British socialist, theosophist, women's rights activist, writer and orator 1847 - 1933
In Death-And After http://books.google.co.in/books?id=0tIQ-MGW6F8C&pg=PA19, p. 19

William Faulkner photo
Próximo