„Anthropologists are a connecting link between poets and scientists; though their field-work among primitive peoples has often made them forget the language of science.“

—  Robert Graves, General sources, "Mammon" an address at the London School of Economics (6 December 1963); published in Mammon and the Black Goddess (1965).
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Robert Graves1
1895 - 1985
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„Science has no prejudices — though scientists often do.“

—  Elisha Gray American electrical engineer 1835 - 1901
Nature's Miracles (1900), Context: Science has no prejudices — though scientists often do. Science is like figures: they do not lie themselves, but the men who figure are often the greatest liars in the world. Energy and vibration: energy, sound, heat, light, explosives (1900); Fords, Howard & Hulbert, p. 201

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„Every principal art has some science for its parent, though the person who mechanically performs the work does not always, and but very seldom, perceive the connection.“

—  Thomas Paine English and American political activist 1737 - 1809
1790s, The Age of Reason, Part I (1794), Context: The Book of Job and the 19th Psalm, which even the Church admits to be more ancient than the chronological order in which they stand in the book called the Bible, are theological orations conformable to the original system of theology. The internal evidence of those orations proves to a demonstration that the study and contemplation of the works of creation, and of the power and wisdom of God, revealed and manifested in those works, made a great part in the religious devotion of the times in which they were written; and it was this devotional study and contemplation that led to the discovery of the principles upon which what are now called sciences are established; and it is to the discovery of these principles that almost all the arts that contribute to the convenience of human life owe their existence. Every principal art has some science for its parent, though the person who mechanically performs the work does not always, and but very seldom, perceive the connection.

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„Even though anthropologists have shown that certain primitive peoples seem to be free from the desire for power, nobody has yet shown how their state of mind can be re-created on a worldwide scale so as to eliminate the struggle for power from the international scene. … International politics, like all politics, is a struggle for power.“

—  Hans Morgenthau American political scientist 1904 - 1980
Politics Among Nations (1948), Context: The struggle for power is universal in time and space and is an undeniable fact of experience. It cannot be denied that throughout historic time, regardless of social, economic and political conditions, states have met each other in contests for power. Even though anthropologists have shown that certain primitive peoples seem to be free from the desire for power, nobody has yet shown how their state of mind can be re-created on a worldwide scale so as to eliminate the struggle for power from the international scene. … International politics, like all politics, is a struggle for power. Whatever the ultimate aims of international politics, power is always the immediate aim. p. 29 (1978 edition).

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„The most remarkable discovery made by scientists is science itself.“

—  Jacob Bronowski Polish-born British mathematician 1908 - 1974
The Creative Process, 1958, Context: The most remarkable discovery made by scientists is science itself. The discovery must be compared in importance with the invention of cave-painting and of writing. Like these earlier human creations, science is an attempt to control our surroundings by entering into them and understanding them from inside. And like them, science has surely made a critical step in human development which cannot be reversed. We cannot conceive a future society without science. I have used three words to describe these far - reaching changes : discovery, invention and creation. There are contexts in which one of these words is more appropriate than the others. p. 97 Partly cited in: Daniel C. Schlenof. " 50 Years Ago: Greatest Scientific Discovery is Science Itself http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/50-100-150-scientific-creativity/," in Scientific American, Aug. 18, 2008.

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