„All our knowledge falls with the bounds of experience.“

—  Immanuel Kant, livro Crítica da Razão Pura

A 146, B 185
Critique of Pure Reason (1781; 1787)

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Immanuel Kant photo
Immanuel Kant87
1724 - 1804

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Immanuel Kant photo

„But though all our knowledge begins with experience, it by no means follows, that all arises out of experience.“

—  Immanuel Kant, livro Crítica da Razão Pura

Introduction I. Of the Difference Between Pure and Empirical Knowledge
Critique of Pure Reason (1781; 1787)
Variante: That all our knowledge begins with experience there can be no doubt.
Contexto: That all our knowledge begins with experience there can be no doubt. For how is it possible that the faculty of cognition should be awakened into exercise otherwise than by means of objects which affect our senses, and partly of them selves produce representations, partly rouse our powers of understanding into activity, to compare, to connect, or to separate these, and so to convert the raw material of our sensuous impressions into a knowledge of objects, which is called experience? In respect of time, therefore, no knowledge of ours is antecedent to experience, but begins with it. But though all our knowledge begins with experience, it by no means follows, that all arises out of experience. For, on the contrary, it is quite possible that our empirical knowledge is a compound of that which we receive through impressions, and that which the faculty of cognition supplies from itself (sensuous impressions giving merely the occasion)... It is, therefore, a question which requires close investigation, and is not to be answered at first sight,—whether there exists a knowledge altogether independent of experience, and even of all sensuous impressions? Knowledge of this kind is called à priori, in contradistinction to empirical knowledge which has its sources à posteriori, that is, in experience.

Michel De Montaigne photo

„Hath God obliged himself not to exceed the bounds of our knowledge?“

—  Michel De Montaigne (1533-1592) French-Occitan author, humanistic philosopher, statesman 1533 - 1592

Book II, Ch. 12
Attributed

Elbert Hubbard photo

„Knowledge is the distilled essence of our intuitions, corroborated by experience.“

—  Elbert Hubbard American writer, publisher, artist, and philosopher fue el escritor del jarron azul 1856 - 1915

Swami Vivekananda photo
David Hume photo
Max Planck photo

„Experiments are the only means of knowledge at our disposal. The rest is poetry, imagination.“

—  Max Planck German theoretical physicist 1858 - 1947

As quoted in Advances in Biochemical Psychopharmacology, Vol. 25 (1980), p. 3

Leonardo Da Vinci photo
John Theophilus Desaguliers photo

„All the knowledge we have of nature depends upon facts; for without observations and experiments our natural philosophy would only be a science of terms and an unintelligible jargon.“

—  John Theophilus Desaguliers French-born British natural philosopher and clergyman 1683 - 1744

Fonte: Course of Experimental Philosophy, 1745, p. v: Preface
Contexto: All the knowledge we have of nature depends upon facts; for without observations and experiments our natural philosophy would only be a science of terms and an unintelligible jargon. But then we must call in Geometry and Arithmetics, to our Assistance, unless we are willing to content ourselves with natural History and conjectural Philosophy. For, as many causes concur in the production of compound effects, we are liable to mistake the predominant cause, unless we can measure the quantity and the effect produced, compare them with, and distinguish them from, each other, to find out the adequate cause of each single effect, and what must be the result of their joint action.

Masashi Kishimoto photo
Albert Einstein photo

„Information is not knowledge. The only source of knowledge is experience.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

According to Barbara Wolff, of The Hebrew University's Albert Einstein Archives, this is not one of Einstein's identifiable quotations. (Source: paralegalpie.com http://www.paralegalpie.com/paralegalpie/2009/11/did-anybody-really-say-that.html.)
The phrase "the only source of knowledge is experience" is found in an English-language essay from 1896: "We can only be guided by what we know, and our only source of knowledge is experience" (Arthur J. Pillsbury, "The Final Word" https://books.google.com/books?id=Mw9IAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA595&dq=%22only+source", Overland Monthly, November 1896). The thought can be seen as a paraphrase of John Locke's argument from his Essay Concerning Human Understanding: "Whence has it [the Mind] all the materials of Reason and Knowledge? To this I answer, in one Word, From Experience". (Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding/Book II/Chapter I, 2.)
The phrase "information is not knowledge" is also found from the nineteenth century https://books.google.com/books?id=W2oAAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA59&dq=%22information+is+not+knowledge%22.
Misattributed

Alfred, Lord Tennyson photo

„To follow knowledge like a sinking star,
Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, livro Ulysses

Fonte: Ulysses (1842), l. 22-32
Contexto: How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use!
As tho' to breath were life. Life piled on life
Were all too little, and of one to me
Little remains: but every hour is saved
From that eternal silence, something more,
A bringer of new things; and vile it were
For some three suns to store and hoard myself,
And this gray spirit yearning in desire
To follow knowledge like a sinking star,
Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.

Pierre-Simon Laplace photo

„Imaginary causes have gradually receded with the widening bounds of knowledge“

—  Pierre-Simon Laplace, livro Philosophical Essay on Probabilities

Philosophical Essay on Probabilities (1902)
Contexto: Imaginary causes have gradually receded with the widening bounds of knowledge and disappear entirely before sound philosophy, which sees in them only the expression of our ignorance of the true causes.<!--p.3

U.G. Krishnamurti photo

„Our mind (and there are no individual minds — only "mind", which is the accumulation of man's knowledge and experience) has created the notion of the psyche and evolution.“

—  U.G. Krishnamurti, livro Mind is a Myth

Fonte: Mind is a Myth (1987), Ch. 1: The Certainty That Blasts Everything
Contexto: Our mind (and there are no individual minds — only "mind", which is the accumulation of man's knowledge and experience) has created the notion of the psyche and evolution. Only technology progresses, while we as a race are moving closer to complete and total destruction of the world and ourselves. Everything in man's consciousness is pushing the whole world, which nature has so laboriously created, toward destruction. There has been no qualitative change in man's thinking; we feel about our neighbours just as the frightened caveman felt towards his. The only thing that has changed is our ability to destroy our neighbor and his property.

Amitabh Bachchan photo

„Experiment is the mother of knowledge.“

—  Madeleine L'Engle American writer 1918 - 2007

Fonte: A Wrinkle in Time: With Related Readings

William Blake photo

„The true method of knowledge is experiment.“

—  William Blake, livro All Religions are One

All Religions are One (1788)
1780s

Chinmayananda Saraswati photo
Nisargadatta Maharaj photo
Pierre Charles Alexandre Louis photo

„All [knowledge] comes from experience, it is true, but experience is nothing if it does not form collections of similar facts. Now, to make collections is to count.“

—  Pierre Charles Alexandre Louis French physician 1787 - 1872

Letter to Jean Cruveilhier (1837), as quoted by William Coleman, Death is a Social Disease: Public Health and Political Economy in Early Industrial France (1982)

Werner Heisenberg photo

„Every experiment destroys some of the knowledge of the system which was obtained by previous experiments.“

—  Werner Heisenberg German theoretical physicist 1901 - 1976

"Critique of the Physical Concepts of the Corpuscular Theory" in The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory (1930) as translated by Carl Eckhart and Frank C. Hoyt, p. 20; also in "The Uncertainty Principle" in The World of Mathematics : A Small Library of the Literature of Mathematics (1956) by James Roy Newman, p. 1051