„To live one's love and hatred, to live that which one is means defeat, resignation, and death. The crimes of society, the hell that man has made or man become unconquerable cosmic forces.“

— Herbert Marcuse, p. 61
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Herbert Marcuse4
1898 - 1979
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„!--99. -->No one deserves to live who has not at least one good-man-and-true for a friend.“

—  Democritus Ancient Greek philosopher, pupil of Leucippus, founder of the atomic theory 460

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„One is still what one is going to cease to be and already what one is going to become. One lives one’s death, one dies one’s life.“

— Jean Paul Sartre French existentialist philosopher, playwright, novelist, screenwriter, political activist, biographer, and literary c... 1905 - 1980
Book 2, "The Melodious Child Dead in Me"

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„To live means to finesse the processes to which one is subjugated.“

— Bertolt Brecht German poet, playwright, theatre director 1898 - 1956
"Notes on Philosophy" in On Politics and Society (1941).

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„There is no subtler, no surer means of overturning the existing basis of society than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose.“

— John Maynard Keynes British economist 1883 - 1946
Context: Lenin is said to have declared that the best way to destroy the capitalist system was to debauch the currency. By a continuing process of inflation, governments can confiscate, secretly and unobserved, an important part of the wealth of their citizens. By this method they not only confiscate, but they confiscate arbitrarily; and, while the process impoverishes many, it actually enriches some. The sight of this arbitrary rearrangement of riches strikes not only at security, but at confidence in the equity of the existing distribution of wealth. Those to whom the system brings windfalls, beyond their deserts and even beyond their expectations or desires, become 'profiteers,' who are the object of the hatred of the bourgeoisie, whom the inflationism has impoverished, not less than of the proletariat. As the inflation proceeds and the real value of the currency fluctuates wildly from month to month, all permanent relations between debtors and creditors, which form the ultimate foundation of capitalism, become so utterly disordered as to be almost meaningless; and the process of wealth-getting degenerates into a gamble and a lottery. Lenin was certainly right. There is no subtler, no surer means of overturning the existing basis of society than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose. Chapter VI, pp. 235-236

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„He means that he loves an inner air, an inner light in which freedom lives and in which a man can draw the breath of self-respect.“

— Adlai Stevenson mid-20th-century Governor of Illinois and Ambassador to the UN 1900 - 1965
Context: It was always accounted a virtue in a man to love his country. With us it is now something more than a virtue. It is a necessity. When an American says that he loves his country, he means not only that he loves the New England hills, the prairies glistening in the sun, the wide and rising plains, the great mountains, and the sea. He means that he loves an inner air, an inner light in which freedom lives and in which a man can draw the breath of self-respect. Men who have offered their lives for their country know that patriotism is not the fear of something; it is the love of something. Speech to the American Legion convention, New York City (27 August 1952); as quoted in "Democratic Candidate Adlai Stevenson Defines the Nature of Patriotism" in Lend Me Your Ears : Great Speeches In History (2004) by William Safire, p. 81 - 82

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„One must be a living man and a posthumous artist.“

— Jean Cocteau French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker 1889 - 1963

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„Even death is not to be feared by one who has lived wisely.“

— Gautama Buddha philosopher, reformer and the founder of Buddhism -566 - -483 a.C.
As quoted in Wisdom for the Soul: Five Millennia of Prescriptions for Spiritual Healing (2006) edited by Larry Chang, p. 193 This is actually a pithy modern-day 'summary' of the "Abhaya Sutta" (AN 4.184). It appears in "Buddha’s Little Instruction Book" by Jack Kornfield (p88).

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