„I have never opened with the QP – on principle.“

— Bobby Fischer, On 1.d4

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Bobby Fischer4
1943 - 2008
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„I have never met a man so ignorant that I could not learn something from him.“

— Galileo Galilei Italian mathematician, physicist, philosopher and astronomer 1564 - 1642
As quoted in The Story of Civilization : The Age of Reason Begins, 1558-1648 (1935) by Will Durant, p. 605

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„California has a sense of experimentation and a sense of openness—openness to new possibilities.“

— Steve Jobs American entrepreneur and co-founder of Apple Inc. 1955 - 2011
Context: Woz and I very much liked Bob Dylan's poetry, and we spent a lot of time thinking about a lot of that stuff. This was California. You could get LSD fresh made from Stanford. You could sleep on the beach at night with your girlfriend. California has a sense of experimentation and a sense of openness—openness to new possibilities. interview in Playboy magazine (February 1985 http://www.playboy.co.uk/article/16311/playboy-interview-steven-jobs) <!-- alternate link : http://gizmodo.com/5694765/29+year+old-steve-jobs-extols-californias-virtues-to-playboy-magazine -->

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„Ah, never to have married, and childless to have died!“

—  Augustus founder of Julio-Claudian dynasty and first emperor of the Roman Empire -63 - 14 a.C.
Quoting Homer's Iliad. Augustus was frequently disappointed in the conduct of some of his children; in Suetonius, Divus Augustus, paragraph 65. Translation: Robert Graves, 1957.

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„We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures that we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.“

— Jawaharlal Nehru Indian lawyer, statesman, and writer, first Prime Minister of India 1889 - 1964
As quoted in Building A Life Of Value : Timeless Wisdom to Inspire and Empower Us (2005) by Jason A. Merchey, p. 74

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„It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.“

— Theodore Roosevelt American politician, 26th president of the United States 1858 - 1919
Context: It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. In this life we get nothing save by effort. Freedom from effort in the present merely means that there has been stored up effort in the past. Context: A life of slothful ease, a life of that peace which springs merely from lack either of desire or of power to strive after great things, is as little worthy of a nation as of an individual. [... ] If you are rich and are worth your salt, you will teach your sons that though they may have leisure, it is not to be spent in idleness; for wisely used leisure merely means that those who possess it, being free from the necessity of working for their livelihood, are all the more bound to carry on some kind of non-remunerative work in science, in letters, in art, in exploration, in historical research—work of the type we most need in this country, the successful carrying out of which reflects most honor upon the nation. We do not admire the man of timid peace. We admire the man who embodies victorious effort; the man who never wrongs his neighbor, who is prompt to help a friend, but who has those virile qualities necessary to win in the stern strife of actual life. It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. In this life we get nothing save by effort. Freedom from effort in the present merely means that there has been stored up effort in the past. A man can be freed from the necessity of work only by the fact that he or his fathers before him have worked to good purpose. If the freedom thus purchased is used aright, and the man still does actual work, though of a different kind, whether as a writer or a general, whether in the field of politics or in the field of exploration and adventure, he shows he deserves his good fortune. But if he treats this period of freedom from the need of actual labor as a period, not of preparation, but of mere enjoyment, even though perhaps not of vicious enjoyment, he shows that he is simply a cumberer of the earth's surface, and he surely unfits himself to hold his own with his fellows if the need to do so should again arise.

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