„Morals excite passions, and produce or prevent actions. Reason of itself is utterly impotent in this particular. The rules of morality, therefore, are not conclusions of our reason.“

—  David Hume, livro A Treatise of Human Nature

Part 1, Section 1
A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40), Book 3: Of morals

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
David Hume photo
David Hume24
Filósofo, historiador e ensaísta britânico 1711 - 1776

Citações relacionadas

Abraham Lincoln photo

„Passion has helped us; but can do so no more. It will in future be our enemy. Reason, cold, calculating, unimpassioned reason, must furnish all the materials for our future support and defence. — Let those materials be moulded into general intelligence, sound morality, and in particular, a reverence for the constitution and laws“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

1830s, The Lyceum Address (1838)
Contexto: Passion has helped us; but can do so no more. It will in future be our enemy. Reason, cold, calculating, unimpassioned reason, must furnish all the materials for our future support and defence. — Let those materials be moulded into general intelligence, sound morality, and in particular, a reverence for the constitution and laws: and, that we improved to the last; that we remained free to the last; that we revered his name to the last; that, during his long sleep, we permitted no hostile foot to pass over or desecrate his resting place; shall be that which to learn the last trump shall awaken our WASHINGTON.
Upon these let the proud fabric of freedom rest, as the rock of its basis; and as truly as has been said of the only greater institution, "the gates of hell shall not prevail against it".

Terry Goodkind photo
Thomas Carlyle photo

„What is all Knowledge too, but recorded Experience, and a product of History; of which, therefore, Reasoning and Belief, no less than Action and Passion, are essential materials.“

—  Thomas Carlyle Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher 1795 - 1881

On History.
1820s, Critical and Miscellaneous Essays (1827–1855)
Variante: What is all Knowledge too, but recorded Experience, and a product of History; of which, therefore, Reasoning and Belief, no less than Action and Passion, are essential materials.

Elizabeth Hardwick photo
Pythagoras photo

„The soul of man is divided into three parts, intelligence, reason, and passion. Intelligence and passion are possessed by other animals, but reason by man alone.“

—  Pythagoras ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher -585 - -495 a.C.

As reported by Alexander Polyhistor, and Diogenes Laërtius in Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, "Pythagoras", Sect. 30, in the translation of C. D. Yonge (1853)
Original: (el) Τὴν δ' ἀνθρώπου ψυχὴν διῃρῆσθαι τριχῆ, εἴς τε νοῦν καὶ φρένας καὶ θυμόν. νοῦν μὲν οὖν καὶ θυμὸν εἶναι καὶ ἐν τοῖς ἄλλοις ζῴοις, φρένας δὲ μόνον ἐν ἀνθρώπῳ.

Zisi photo

„When the passions, such as joy, anger, grief, and pleasure, have not awakened, that is our central self, or moral being (chung). When these passions awaken and each and all attain due measure and degree, that is harmony, or the moral order (ho). Our central self or moral being is the great basis of existence, and harmony or moral order is the universal law in the world.
When our true central self and harmony are realised, the universe then becomes a cosmos and all things attain their full growth and development.“

—  Zisi Chinese philosopher -481 - -402 a.C.

Variant translation: "Before joy, anger, sadness and happiness are expressed, they are called the inner self; when they are expressed to the proper degree, they are called harmony. The inner self is the correct foundation of the world, and harmony is the illustrious Way. When a man has achieved the inner self and harmony, the heaven and earth are orderly and the myriad things are nourished and grow thereby."
As translated by Lin Yutang in The Importance of Living (1937), pp. 143–144
Fonte: The Doctrine of the Mean, p. 104

Gregory of Nyssa photo
Paddy Chayefsky photo

„When I say impotent, I mean I've lost even my desire to work. That's a hell of a lot more primal passion than sex. I've lost my reason for being. My purpose.“

—  Paddy Chayefsky American playwright, screenwriter and novelist 1923 - 1981

Dr. Bock.
The Hospital (1971)
Contexto: When I say impotent, I mean I've lost even my desire to work. That's a hell of a lot more primal passion than sex. I've lost my reason for being. My purpose. The only thing I ever truly loved. … We have established the most enormous, medical entity ever conceived and people are sicker than ever! WE CURE NOTHING! WE HEAL NOTHING! The whole goddamn wretched world is strangulating in front of our eyes. That's what I mean when I say impotent. You don't know what the hell I'm talking about, do you?... I'm tired. I'm very tired, Miss Drummond. And I hurt. And I've got nothing going for me anymore. Can you understand that?... And you also understand that the only admissible matter left is death.

John Wesley photo

„Passion and prejudice govern the world; only under the name of reason. It is our part, by religion and reason joined, to counteract them all we can.“

—  John Wesley Christian theologian 1703 - 1791

Letter to John Benson (5 October 1770); published in Wesley's Select Letters (1837), p. 207
1770s

John Dryden photo
Alexander Pope photo

„What Reason weaves, by Passion is undone.“

—  Alexander Pope eighteenth century English poet 1688 - 1744

Fonte: Essay on Man and Other Poems

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg photo

„Man is to be found in reason, God in the passions.“

—  Georg Christoph Lichtenberg German scientist, satirist 1742 - 1799

K 21
Aphorisms (1765-1799), Notebook K (1789-1793)

Iris Murdoch photo

„Perhaps misguided moral passion is better than confused indifference.“

—  Iris Murdoch, livro The Book and the Brotherhood

The Book and the Brotherhood (1987) p. 248.

Abraham Lincoln photo

„Passion has helped us; but can do so no more. It will in future be our enemy. Reason, cold, calculating, unimpassioned reason, must furnish all the materials for our future support and defence.“

—  Abraham Lincoln 16th President of the United States 1809 - 1865

Let those materials be moulded into general intelligence, sound morality, and in particular, a reverence for the constitution and laws: and, that we improved to the last; that we remained free to the last; that we revered his name to the last; that, during his long sleep, we permitted no hostile foot to pass over or desecrate his resting place; shall be that which to learn the last trump shall awaken our WASHINGTON.
Upon these let the proud fabric of freedom rest, as the rock of its basis; and as truly as has been said of the only greater institution, "the gates of hell shall not prevail against it".
1830s, The Lyceum Address (1838)

B. W. Powe photo
Alexander Hamilton photo
Samuel Taylor Coleridge photo
Slavoj Žižek photo
Jonathan Haidt photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“