„Pythagoras said, that it was requisite either to be silent, or to say something better than silence.“

—  Estobeu, 36
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 Pythagoras photo

„It is better wither to be silent, or to say things of more value than silence.“

—  Pythagoras ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher -585 - -500 a.C.
Context: It is better wither to be silent, or to say things of more value than silence. Sooner throw a pearl at hazard than an idle or useless word; and do not say a little in many words, but a great deal in a few. As quoted in A Dictionary of Thoughts: Being a Cyclopedia of Laconic Quotations from the Best Authors of the World, both Ancient and Modern (1908) by Tyron Edwards, p. 525

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Dionysius I of Syracuse photo

„Let thy speech be better than silence, or be silent.“

—  Dionysius I of Syracuse Sicilian tyrant -430 - -366 a.C.
Frag. 6, as quoted in Handy-book of Literary Curiosities (1892) by William Shepard Walsh, p. 1009.

 Confucius photo
 Pythagoras photo

„Silence is better than unmeaning words.“

—  Pythagoras ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher -585 - -500 a.C.
As quoted in Encyclopaedia Americana (1832) Vol. X, p. 445 edited by Francis Lieber, E. Wigglesworth, and Thomas Gamaliel Bradford

Amy Goodman photo

„Go to where the silence is and say something.“

—  Amy Goodman American broadcast journalist, syndicated columnist, investigative reporter and author 1957

„Voice, come out of the silence.
Say something.“

—  Theodore Roethke American poet 1908 - 1963
Context: p> Voice, come out of the silence. Say something. Appear in the form of a spider Or a moth beating the curtain.Tell me: Which is the way I take; Out of what door do I go, Where and to whom?</p The Lost Son, ll. 24 - 29

Francois Rabelais photo

„In the school of Pythagoras, taciturnity was the symbol of abstracted and superlative knowledge, and the silence of the Egyptians was agnited as an expressive manner of divine adoration; this caused the pontiffs of Hierapolis to sacrifice to the great deity in silence, impercussively, without any vociferous or obstreperous sound.“

—  Francois Rabelais major French Renaissance writer 1494 - 1553
Context: Queen Whims, or Queen Quintessence (which you please), perceiving that we stood as mute as fishes, said: Your taciturnity speaks you not only disciples of Pythagoras, from whom the venerable antiquity of my progenitors in successive propagation was emaned and derives its original, but also discovers, that through the revolution of many retrograde moons, you have in Egypt pressed the extremities of your fingers with the hard tenants of your mouths, and scalptized your heads with frequent applications of your unguicules. In the school of Pythagoras, taciturnity was the symbol of abstracted and superlative knowledge, and the silence of the Egyptians was agnited as an expressive manner of divine adoration; this caused the pontiffs of Hierapolis to sacrifice to the great deity in silence, impercussively, without any vociferous or obstreperous sound. My design is not to enter into a privation of gratitude towards you, but by a vivacious formality, though matter were to abstract itself from me, excentricate to you my cogitations. Having spoken this, she only said to her officers, Tabachins, a panacea; and straight they desired us not to take it amiss if the queen did not invite us to dine with her; for she never ate anything at dinner but some categories, jecabots, emnins, dimions, abstractions, harborins, chelemins, second intentions, carradoths, antitheses, metempsychoses, transcendent prolepsies, and such other light food. Chapter 20 : How the Quintessence cured the sick with a song

Alastair Reynolds photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“