„Because Impudence is a Vice, it does not follow that Modesty is a Virtue; it is built upon Shame, a Passion in our Nature, and may be either Good or Bad according to the Actions perform'd from that Motive.“

—  Bernard Mandeville, Remark C, p. 65
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Bernard Mandeville2
1670 - 1733
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 Aristotle photo

„The vices respectively fall short of or exceed what is right in both passions and actions, while virtue both finds and chooses that which is intermediate.“

—  Aristotle Classical Greek philosopher, student of Plato and founder of Western philosophy -384 - -322 a.C.
Book II, 1107a.4 Variant: Some vices miss what is right because they are deficient, others because they are excessive, in feelings or in actions, while virtue finds and chooses the mean.

Jean Jacques Rousseau photo
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John Adams photo

„Tis impossible to judge with much Præcision of the true Motives and Qualities of human Actions, or of the Propriety of Rules contrived to govern them, without considering with like Attention, all the Passions, Appetites, Affections in Nature from which they flow.“

—  John Adams 2nd President of the United States 1735 - 1826
Context: Tis impossible to judge with much Præcision of the true Motives and Qualities of human Actions, or of the Propriety of Rules contrived to govern them, without considering with like Attention, all the Passions, Appetites, Affections in Nature from which they flow. An intimate Knowledge therefore of the intellectual and moral World is the sole foundation on which a stable structure of Knowledge can be erected. Letter to Jonathan Sewall (October 1759)

 Seneca the Younger photo

„Death is a release from and an end of all pains: beyond it our sufferings cannot extend: it restores us to the peaceful rest in which we lay before we were born. If anyone pities the dead, he ought also to pity those who have not been born. Death is neither a good nor a bad thing, for that alone which is something can be a good or a bad thing: but that which is nothing, and reduces all things to nothing, does not hand us over to either fortune, because good and bad require some material to work upon. Fortune cannot take ahold of that which Nature has let go, nor can a man be unhappy if he is nothing.“

—  Seneca the Younger Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, and dramatist -4 - 65 a.C.
Mors dolorum omnium exsolutio est et finis ultra quem mala nostra non exeunt, quae nos in illam tranquillitatem in qua antequam nasceremur iacuimus reponit. Si mortuorum aliquis miseretur, et non natorum misereatur. Mors nec bonum nec malum est; id enim potest aut bonum aut malum esse quod aliquid est; quod uero ipsum nihil est et omnia in nihilum redigit, nulli nos fortunae tradit. Mala enim bonaque circa aliquam uersantur materiam: non potest id fortuna tenere quod natura dimisit, nec potest miser esse qui nullus est. From Ad Marciam De Consolatione (Of Consolation, To Marcia), cap. XIX, line 5 In L. Anneus Seneca: Minor Dialogues (1889), translated by Aubrey Stewart, George Bell and Sons (London), p. 190.

Zeno of Citium photo

„The end may be defined as life in accordance with nature or, in other words, in accordance with our own human nature as well as that of the universe.“

—  Zeno of Citium ancient Greek philosopher -334 - -263 a.C.
As quoted by Diogenes Laërtius, in Lives of Eminent Philosophers: 'Zeno', 7.87. The "end" here means “the goal of life.”

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 Sallustius photo
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William James photo

„We are proud of a human nature that could be so passionately extreme, but we shrink from advising others to follow the example.“

—  William James American philosopher, psychologist, and pragmatist 1842 - 1910
Context: This practically amounts to saying that much that it is legitimate to admire in this field need nevertheless not be imitated, and that religious phenomena, like all other human phenomena, are subject to the law of the golden mean. Political reformers accomplish their successive tasks in the history of nations by being blind for the time to other causes. Great schools of art work out the effects which it is their mission to reveal, at the cost of a one-sidedness for which other schools must make amends. We accept a John Howard, a Mazzini, a Botticelli, a Michael Angelo, with a kind of indulgence. We are glad they existed to show us that way, but we are glad there are also other ways of seeing and taking life. So of many of the saints we have looked at. We are proud of a human nature that could be so passionately extreme, but we shrink from advising others to follow the example. Lectures XIV and XV, "The Value of Saintliness"

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„There is no act, however virtuous, for which ingenuity may not find some bad motive.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826
Letter to Edward Dowse (19 April 1803)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“