„At the words “his philosophy, my philosophy,” one is always reminded of that line in Nathan: … “What kind of God is it who belongs to a man?”“

—  Friedrich Schlegel, Lucinde and the Fragments, P. Firchow, trans. (1991) § 99, reference is to Lessing, Nathan der Weise
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Friedrich Schlegel6
1772 - 1829
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„In my philosophy everyone, including the poor, sick and aged, belongs to one family — God’s Family.“

—  Sri Chinmoy Indian writer and guru 1931 - 2007
Context: In my philosophy everyone, including the poor, sick and aged, belongs to one family — God’s Family. God is at once poor and rich, sick and healthy, young and old, for He exists inside each and every individual. Here on earth we are all God’s children.

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Antoni Gaudí photo

„The straight line belongs to Man. The curved line belongs to God.“

—  Antoni Gaudí Catalan architect 1852 - 1926
The real author seems to be Pierre Albert-Birot https://books.google.com/books?id=3Ul51CwjUOcC&pg=PA290&dq=%22the+curved+line+that+belongs+let%27s+say+to+God+and+the+straight+line+that+belongs+to+man%22&hl=de&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=%22the%20curved%20line%20that%20belongs%20let%27s%20say%20to%20God%20and%20the%20straight%20line%20that%20belongs%20to%20man%22&f=false.

William Lane Craig photo

„The man who claims to have no need of philosophy is the one most apt to be fooled by it.“

—  William Lane Craig American Christian apologist and evangelist 1949
A Reasonable Response: Answers to Tough Questions on God, Christianity, and the Bible (2013)

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel photo

„Only one word more concerning the desire to teach the world what it ought to be. For such a purpose philosophy at least always comes too late.“

—  Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel German philosopher 1770 - 1831
Context: Only one word more concerning the desire to teach the world what it ought to be. For such a purpose philosophy at least always comes too late. Philosophy, as the thought of the world, does not appear until reality has completed its formative process, and made itself ready. History thus corroborates the teaching of the conception that only in the maturity of reality does the ideal appear as counterpart to the real, apprehends the real world in its substance, and shapes it into an intellectual kingdom. When philosophy paints its grey in grey, one form of life has become old, and by means of grey it cannot be rejuvenated, but only known. The owl of Minerva takes its flight only when the shades of night are gathering. Preface xxx Variant: When philosophy paints its grey on grey, then has a shape of life grown old. By philosophy's grey on grey it cannot be rejuvenated but only understood. The owl of Minerva spreads its wings only with the falling of the dusk. As translated by T. M. Knox, (1952) <!-- p. 13 -->

Donald J. Trump photo

„My philosophy is always to hire the best from the best.“

—  Donald J. Trump 45th President of the United States of America 1946
p. 31

Eleanor Roosevelt photo

„One's philosophy is not best expressed in words; it is expressed in the choices one makes.“

—  Eleanor Roosevelt American politician, diplomat, and activist, and First Lady of the United States 1884 - 1962
Context: One's philosophy is not best expressed in words; it is expressed in the choices one makes. In stopping to think through the meaning of what I have learned, there is much that I believe intensely, much I am unsure of. In the long run, we shape our lives and we shape ourselves. The process never ends until we die. And, the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility. Foreword (January 1960)

Francis Bacon photo

„God never wrought miracle, to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.“

—  Francis Bacon English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, and author 1561 - 1626
Context: I had rather believe all the fables in the legends and the Talmud and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind. And therefore, God never wrought miracle, to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it. A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion. Of Atheism; in the original archaic English this read: I HAD rather beleeve all the Fables in the Legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, then that this universall Frame, is without a Minde. And therefore, God never wrought Miracle, to convince Atheisme, because his Ordinary Works convince it. It is true, that a little Philosophy inclineth Mans Minde to Atheisme; But depth in Philosophy, bringeth Mens Mindes about to Religion.

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Karl Jaspers photo

„My path was not the normal one of professors of philosophy.“

—  Karl Jaspers German psychiatrist and philosopher 1883 - 1969
Context: My path was not the normal one of professors of philosophy. I did not intend to become a doctor of philosophy by studying philosophy (I am in fact a doctor of medicine) nor did I by any means, intend originally to qualify for a professorship by a dissertation on philosophy. To decide to become a philosopher seemed as foolish to me as to decide to become a poet. Since my schooldays, however, I was guided by philosophical questions. Philosophy seemed to me the supreme, even the sole, concern of man. Yet a certain awe kept me from making it my profession.

Abraham Lincoln photo
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James Madison photo

„Philosophy is common sense with big words.“

—  James Madison 4th president of the United States (1809 to 1817) 1751 - 1836

Albert Camus photo

„There is always a philosophy for lack of courage.“

—  Albert Camus French author and journalist 1913 - 1960

Muhammad Ali Jinnah photo

„Hindus and Muslims belong to two different religious philosophies, social customs, litterateurs“

—  Muhammad Ali Jinnah Founder and 1st Governor General of Pakistan 1876 - 1948
Context: It is extremely difficult to appreciate why our Hindu friends fail to understand the real nature of Islam and Hinduism. They are not religions in the strict sense of the word, but are, in fact, different and distinct social orders, and it is a dream that the Hindus and Muslims can ever evolve a common nationality, and this misconception of one Indian nation has troubles and will lead India to destruction if we fail to revise our notions in time. The Hindus and Muslims belong to two different religious philosophies, social customs, litterateurs. They neither intermarry nor interdine together and, indeed, they belong to two different civilizations which are based mainly on conflicting ideas and conceptions. Their aspect on life and of life are different. It is quite clear that Hindus and Mussalmans (Muslims) derive their inspiration from different sources of history. They have different epics, different heroes, and different episodes. Very often the hero of one is a foe of the other and, likewise, their victories and defeats overlap. To yoke together two such nations under a single state, one as a numerical minority and the other as a majority, must lead to growing discontent and final destruction of any fabric that may be so built for the government of such a state. Presidential Address to All India Muslim League's Session on March 22, 1940

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