„Men of integrity are generally pretty obstinate in adhering to an opinion once adopted.“

—  William Cobbett, Life and Adventures of Peter Porcupine (1796), P. 23.
William Cobbett photo
William Cobbett
1763 - 1835

Citações relacionadas

Agatha Christie photo

„I do not argue with obstinate men. I act in spite of them.“

—  Agatha Christie, livro The Mystery of the Blue Train
The Mystery of the Blue Train (1928), Hercule Poirot

„In time of war all countries behave equally badly, because the power of action is handed over to stupid and obstinate men.“

—  Kenneth Clark Art historian, broadcaster and museum director 1903 - 1983
The Other Half: A Self Portrait http://books.google.com/books?id=4gg0AAAAMAAJ&q=%22In+time+of+war+all+countries+behave+equally+badly+because+the+power+of+action+is+handed+over+to+stupid+and+obstinate+men%22&pg=PA4#v=onepage (1977)

Edwin Abbott Abbott photo

„It is reported so. But men are divided in opinion as to the facts. And even granting the facts, they explain them in different ways. And in any case, however great may be the number of different explanations, no one has adopted or suggested the theory of a Fourth Dimension.“

—  Edwin Abbott Abbott, livro Flatland
Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions (1884), PART II: OTHER WORLDS, Context: p>O, my Lord, my Lord, behold, I cast myself in faith upon conjecture, not knowing the facts; and I appeal to your Lordship to confirm or deny my logical anticipations. If I am wrong, I yield, and will no longer demand a fourth Dimension; but, if I am right, my Lord will listen to reason.I ask therefore, is it, or is it not, the fact, that ere now your countrymen also have witnessed the descent of Beings of a higher order than their own, entering closed rooms, even as your Lordship entered mine, without the opening of doors or windows, and appearing and vanishing at will? On the reply to this question I am ready to stake everything. Deny it, and I am henceforth silent. Only vouchsafe an answer.SPHERE. (AFTER A PAUSE). It is reported so. But men are divided in opinion as to the facts. And even granting the facts, they explain them in different ways. And in any case, however great may be the number of different explanations, no one has adopted or suggested the theory of a Fourth Dimension.Therefore, pray have done with this trifling, and let us return to business.</p Chapter 19. How, Though the Sphere Showed Me Other Mysteries of Spaceland, I Still Desired More; and What Came of It

Tennessee Williams photo
David Hume photo
Joshua Jackson photo
Theodore Roosevelt photo

„We must demand the highest order of integrity and ability in our public men“

—  Theodore Roosevelt, The Strenuous Life
1900s, The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses (1900), The Strenuous Life, Context: Let us, as we value our own self-respect, face the responsibilities with proper seriousness, courage, and high resolve. We must demand the highest order of integrity and ability in our public men who are to grapple with these new problems. We must hold to a rigid accountability those public servants who show unfaithfulness to the interests of the nation or inability to rise to the high level of the new demands upon our strength and our resources. Of course we must remember not to judge any public servant by any one act, and especially should we beware of attacking the men who are merely the occasions and not the causes of disaster.

Thomas Paine photo

„It is never to be expected in a revolution that every man is to change his opinion at the same moment. There never yet was any truth or any principle so irresistibly obvious that all men believed it at once.“

—  Thomas Paine English and American political activist 1737 - 1809
1790s, First Principles of Government (1795), Context: It is never to be expected in a revolution that every man is to change his opinion at the same moment. There never yet was any truth or any principle so irresistibly obvious that all men believed it at once. Time and reason must cooperate with each other to the final establishment of any principle; and therefore those who may happen to be first convinced have not a right to persecute others, on whom conviction operates more slowly. The moral principle of revolutions is to instruct, not to destroy.

Henry Taylor photo

„Conscience is, in most men, an anticipation of the opinions of others.“

—  Henry Taylor English playwright and poet 1800 - 1886
The Statesman (1836), Ch. 9. p. 63

George Berkeley photo

„Few men think; yet all have opinions.“

—  George Berkeley, livro Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous
Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (1713), Philonous to Hylas. The Second Dialogue. This appears in a passage first added in the third edition, (1734)

Leonardo Da Vinci photo

„The greatest deception men suffer is from their own opinions.“

—  Leonardo Da Vinci Italian Renaissance polymath 1452 - 1519
XIX Philosophical Maxims. Morals. Polemics and Speculations.

James A. Michener photo
Salman Rushdie photo
Louis Sullivan photo

„No complete architecture has yet appeared in the history of the world because men, in this form of art alone, have obstinately sought to express themselves solely in terms either of the head or of the heart.“

—  Louis Sullivan American architect 1856 - 1924
Emotional Architecture as Compared to Intellectual (1894), Context: No complete architecture has yet appeared in the history of the world because men, in this form of art alone, have obstinately sought to express themselves solely in terms either of the head or of the heart. I hold that architectural art, thus far, has failed to reach its highest development, its fullest capability of imagination, of thought and expression, because it has not yet found a way to become truly plastic: it does not yet respond to the poet's touch. That it is today the only art for which the multitudinous rhythms of outward nature, the manifold fluctuations of man's inner being have no significance, no place.

Brian W. Aldiss photo
Jerome photo

„And had I taken the line -so often adopted by strong men in controversy- of justifying the means by the result.“

—  Jerome Catholic saint and Doctor of the Church 345 - 420
Letters, Et sicut viri fortes in controversiis solent facere, culpam praemio redimerem. Letter 48

Bertrand Russell photo

„This is one of those views which are so absurd that only very learned men could possibly adopt them“

—  Bertrand Russell logician, one of the first analytic philosophers and political activist 1872 - 1970
1950s, My Philosophical Development (1959), Context: Some modern philosophers have gone so far as to say that words should never be confronted with facts but should live in a pure, autonomous world where they are compared only with other words. When you say, ‘the cat is a carnivorous animal,’ you do not mean that actual cats eat actual meat, but only that in zoology books the cat is classified among carnivora. These authors tell us that the attempt to confront language with fact is ‘metaphysics’ and is on this ground to be condemned. This is one of those views which are so absurd that only very learned men could possibly adopt them. p. 110

W. Somerset Maugham photo

„Men have an extraordinarily erroneous opinion of their position in nature; and the error is ineradicable.“

—  W. Somerset Maugham British playwright, novelist, short story writer 1874 - 1965
A Writer's Notebook (1946), "1896", p. 20

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

x