„A sweet content
Passing all wisdom or its fairest flower.“

Orion (1843), Book iii, Canto ii.

Richard Henry Horne photo
Richard Henry Horne7
English poet and critic 1802 - 1884

Citações relacionadas

John Muir photo
John Milton photo

„O fairest flower! no sooner blown but blasted,
Soft silken primrose fading timelessly.“

—  John Milton English epic poet 1608 - 1674

Ode on the Death of a fair Infant, dying of a Cough, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

Pete Seeger photo

„Where have all the flowers gone, long time passing?
Where have all the flowers gone, long time ago?“

—  Pete Seeger American folk singer 1919 - 2014

"Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" (1955)
Contexto: Where have all the flowers gone, long time passing?
Where have all the flowers gone, long time ago?
Where have all the flowers gone?
Young girls have picked them everyone.
Oh, when will they ever learn?

Jon Anderson photo

„Sweet songs of youth, the wise, the meeting of all wisdom
To believe in the good in man.“

—  Jon Anderson English singer 1944

Lyrics of "Loved by the Sun", on the soundtrack of the film Legend (1986).

Edgar Allan Poe photo
Cao Xueqin photo

„All, insubstantial, doomed to pass,
As moonlight mirrored in the water
Or flowers reflected in a glass.“

—  Cao Xueqin, livro Dream of the Red Chamber

Original: (zh) 一个空劳牵挂。一个是水中月,一个是镜中花。
Fonte: Dream of the Red Chamber (c. 1760), Chapter 5

William Cullen Bryant photo

„Loveliest of lovely things are they,
On earth, that soonest pass away.
The rose that lives its little hour
Is prized beyond the sculptured flower.“

—  William Cullen Bryant American romantic poet and journalist 1794 - 1878

A Scene on the Banks of the Hudson http://www.4literature.net/William_Cullen_Bryant/Scene_on_the_Banks_of_the_Hudson/, st. 3 (1828)

Louisa May Alcott photo
John Ruysbroeck photo

„You should watch the wise bee and do as it does. It dwells in unity, in the congregation of its fellows, and goes forth, not in the storm, but in calm and still weather, in the sunshine, towards all those flowers in which sweetness may be found.“

—  John Ruysbroeck Flemish mystic 1293 - 1381

The Spiritual Espousals (c. 1340)
Contexto: You should watch the wise bee and do as it does. It dwells in unity, in the congregation of its fellows, and goes forth, not in the storm, but in calm and still weather, in the sunshine, towards all those flowers in which sweetness may be found. It does not rest on any flower, neither on any beauty nor on any sweetness; but it draws from them honey and wax, that is to say, sweetness and light-giving matter, and brings both to the unity of the hive, that therewith it may produce fruits, and be greatly profitable. Christ, the Eternal Sun, shining into the open heart, causes that heart to grow and to bloom, and it overflows with all the inward powers with joy and sweetness. So the wise man will do like the bee, and he will fly forth with attention and with reason and with discretion, towards all those gifts and towards all that sweetness which he has ever experienced, and towards all the good which God has ever done to him. And in the light of love and with inward observation, he will taste of the multitude of consolations and good things; and will not rest upon any flower of the gifts of God, but, laden with gratitude and praise, will fly back into the unity, wherein he wishes to rest and to dwell eternally with God.

Letitia Elizabeth Landon photo
Thomas Henry Huxley photo
Thomas Gray photo

„Full many a gem of purest ray serene,
The dark unfathomed caves of ocean bear:
Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,
And waste its sweetness on the desert air.“

—  Thomas Gray English poet, historian 1716 - 1771

St. 14
Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard http://www.thomasgray.org/cgi-bin/display.cgi?text=elcc (written 1750, publ. 1751)
Fonte: An Elegy Written In A Country Churchyard

Ralph Waldo Emerson photo
Virgil photo

„Euryalus
In death went reeling down,
And blood streamed on his handsome length, his neck
Collapsing let his head fall on his shoulder—
As a bright flower cut by a passing plow
Will droop and wither slowly, or a poppy
Bow its head upon its tired stalk
When overborne by a passing rain.“

—  Virgil, Eneida

Compare:
Μήκων δ' ὡς ἑτέρωσε κάρη βάλεν, ἥ τ' ἐνὶ κήπῳ
καρπῷ βριθομένη νοτίῃσί τε εἰαρινῇσιν,
ὣς ἑτέρωσ' ἤμυσε κάρη πήληκι βαρυνθέν.
He bent drooping his head to one side, as a garden poppy
bends beneath the weight of its yield and the rains of springtime;
so his head bent slack to one side beneath the helm's weight.
Homer, Iliad, VIII, 306–308 (tr. R. Lattimore)
Original: (la) Volvitur Euryalus leto, pulchrosque per artus
It cruor inque umeros cervix conlapsa recumbit:
Purpureus veluti cum flos succisus aratro
Languescit moriens; lassove papavera collo
Demisere caput, pluvia cum forte gravantur.
Fonte: Aeneid (29–19 BC), Book IX, Lines 433–437 (tr. Fitzgerald)

Lin Yutang photo
William Cowper photo

„His purposes will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;
The bud may have a bitter taste,
But sweet will be the flower.“

—  William Cowper (1731–1800) English poet and hymnodist 1731 - 1800

No. 35, "Light Shining out of Darkness".
Olney Hymns (1779)

Margaret Fuller photo

„With equal sweetness the commissioned hours
Shed light and dew upon both weeds and flowers.“

—  Margaret Fuller American feminist, poet, author, and activist 1810 - 1850

Life Without and Life Within (1859), The Thankful and the Thankless
Contexto: With equal sweetness the commissioned hours
Shed light and dew upon both weeds and flowers.
The weeds unthankful raise their vile heads high,
Flaunting back insult to the gracious sky;
While the dear flowers, wht fond humility,
Uplift the eyelids of a starry eye
In speechless homage, and, from grateful hearts,
Perfume that homage all around imparts.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“