„A sweet content
Passing all wisdom or its fairest flower.“

—  Richard Henry Horne, Orion (1843), Book iii, Canto ii.
Richard Henry Horne photo
Richard Henry Horne7
English poet and critic 1802 - 1884
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John Muir photo

„Handle a book as a bee does a flower, extract its sweetness but do not damage it.“

—  John Muir Scottish-born American naturalist and author 1838 - 1914

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„Where have all the flowers gone, long time passing?
Where have all the flowers gone, long time ago?“

—  Pete Seeger American folk singer 1919 - 2014
Context: Where have all the flowers gone, long time passing? Where have all the flowers gone, long time ago? Where have all the flowers gone? Young girls have picked them everyone. Oh, when will they ever learn? "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" (1955)

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John Milton photo

„O fairest flower! no sooner blown but blasted,
Soft silken primrose fading timelessly.“

—  John Milton English epic poet 1608 - 1674
Ode on the Death of a fair Infant, dying of a Cough, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919)

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Jon Anderson photo

„Sweet songs of youth, the wise, the meeting of all wisdom
To believe in the good in man.“

—  Jon Anderson English singer 1944
Lyrics of "Loved by the Sun", on the soundtrack of the film Legend (1986).

Edgar Allan Poe photo

„Yes, Heaven is thine; but this
Is a world of sweets and sours;
Our flowers are merely—flowers.“

—  Edgar Allan Poe American author, poet, editor and literary critic 1809 - 1849
"Israfel", st. 7 (1831).

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William Cullen Bryant photo

„Loveliest of lovely things are they,
On earth, that soonest pass away.
The rose that lives its little hour
Is prized beyond the sculptured flower.“

—  William Cullen Bryant American romantic poet and journalist 1794 - 1878
A Scene on the Banks of the Hudson http://www.4literature.net/William_Cullen_Bryant/Scene_on_the_Banks_of_the_Hudson/, st. 3 (1828)

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John Ruysbroeck photo

„You should watch the wise bee and do as it does. It dwells in unity, in the congregation of its fellows, and goes forth, not in the storm, but in calm and still weather, in the sunshine, towards all those flowers in which sweetness may be found.“

—  John Ruysbroeck Flemish mystic 1293 - 1381
Context: You should watch the wise bee and do as it does. It dwells in unity, in the congregation of its fellows, and goes forth, not in the storm, but in calm and still weather, in the sunshine, towards all those flowers in which sweetness may be found. It does not rest on any flower, neither on any beauty nor on any sweetness; but it draws from them honey and wax, that is to say, sweetness and light-giving matter, and brings both to the unity of the hive, that therewith it may produce fruits, and be greatly profitable. Christ, the Eternal Sun, shining into the open heart, causes that heart to grow and to bloom, and it overflows with all the inward powers with joy and sweetness. So the wise man will do like the bee, and he will fly forth with attention and with reason and with discretion, towards all those gifts and towards all that sweetness which he has ever experienced, and towards all the good which God has ever done to him. And in the light of love and with inward observation, he will taste of the multitude of consolations and good things; and will not rest upon any flower of the gifts of God, but, laden with gratitude and praise, will fly back into the unity, wherein he wishes to rest and to dwell eternally with God.

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Letitia Elizabeth Landon photo

„Leaves grow green to fall,
Flowers grow fair to fade,
Fruits grow ripe to rot —
All but for passing made.“

—  Letitia Elizabeth Landon English poet and novelist 1802 - 1838
(14th October 1826) Changes (27th January 1827) Willow Leaves See under Translations

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