„Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. The fearful are caught as often as the bold.“

—  Helen Keller, Let Us Have Faith (1940)
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Helen Keller38
1880 - 1968
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„Question with boldness even the existence of a god; because, if there be one, he must more approve the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826
Context: Your reason is now mature enough to examine this object [religion]. In the first place divest yourself of all bias in favour of novelty & singularity of opinion. Indulge them in any other subject rather than that of religion. It is too important, & the consequences of error may be too serious. On the other hand shake off all the fears & servile prejudices under which weak minds are servilely crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a god; because, if there be one, he must more approve the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear. Scan of the original page http://memory.loc.gov/master/mss/mtj/mtj1/007/0900/0961.jpg at The Library of Congress.

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„The prince must consider, as has been in part said before, how to avoid those things which will make him hated or contemptible; and as often as he shall have succeeded he will have fulfilled his part, and he need not fear any danger in other reproaches.“

—  Niccolo Machiavelli Italian politician, Writer and Author 1469 - 1527
Context: The prince must consider, as has been in part said before, how to avoid those things which will make him hated or contemptible; and as often as he shall have succeeded he will have fulfilled his part, and he need not fear any danger in other reproaches. It makes him hated above all things, as I have said, to be rapacious, and to be a violator of the property and women of his subjects, from both of which he must abstain. And when neither their property nor honour is touched, the majority of men live content, and he has only to contend with the ambition of a few, whom he can curb with ease in many ways. It makes him contemptible to be considered fickle, frivolous, effeminate, mean-spirited, irresolute, from all of which a prince should guard himself as from a rock; and he should endeavour to show in his actions greatness, courage, gravity, and fortitude; and in his private dealings with his subjects let him show that his judgments are irrevocable, and maintain himself in such reputation that no one can hope either to deceive him or to get round him. That prince is highly esteemed who conveys this impression of himself, and he who is highly esteemed is not easily conspired against; for, provided it is well known that he is an excellent man and revered by his people, he can only be attacked with difficulty. Ch. 19: 'That one should avoid being despised and hated'

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„And bold Stesichorus and rash Sappho, who feared not Leucas but took the manly leap.“

—  Statius Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature) 40 - 96
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