„They understood the basic principles of morals: that nothing is moral always, and anything is moral under the right circumstances.“

"The Persistence of Vision", The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (March 1978), reprinted as the title story in The Persistence of Vision (1978)

Citações relacionadas

Robert A. Heinlein photo
William Ewart Gladstone photo

„Nothing, that is morally wrong, can be politically right.“

—  William Ewart Gladstone British Liberal politician and prime minister of the United Kingdom 1809 - 1898

No citation to Gladstone found. Hannah More https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_More in 1837 in Hints Towards Forming the Character of a Young Princess https://books.google.com/books?id=lv5JAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA179&lpg=PA179&dq=%E2%80%9CNothing+that+is+morally+wrong+can+be+politically+right.%E2%80%9D&source=bl&ots=ne_BjY9onV&sig=8RyZJKi_o7AvvR3N9WcQUU5Q0TI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=84mhVIufIoahyASOrYCoAw&ved=0CEMQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=%E2%80%9CNothing%20that%20is%20morally%20wrong%20can%20be%20politically%20right.%E2%80%9D&f=false, The Works of Hannah More, Vol. 4, said the following on p. 179: "On the Whole, we need not hesitate to assert, that in the long course of events, nothing, that is morally wrong, can be politically right. Nothing, that is inequitable, can be finally successful."
Misattributed

Ayn Rand photo

„There can be no compromise on moral principles.“

—  Ayn Rand Russian-American novelist and philosopher 1905 - 1982

Fonte: The Virtue of Selfishness: A New Concept of Egoism

Friedrich Nietzsche photo

„A moral system valid for all is basically immoral.“

—  Friedrich Nietzsche, livro Para Além do Bem e do Mal

Generally attributed to Nietzsche, this is a quotation from Curtis Cate's Friedrich Nietzsche: A Biography (2003) and is the author's interpretation of Nietzsche's Aphorism 221 (Beyond Good and Evil)
Misattributed

George Ade photo

„Moral: Don't try to Account for Anything.“

—  George Ade American writer, newspaper columnist and playwright 1866 - 1944

The Fable of the Caddy who Hurt His Head While Thinking

Hans Morgenthau photo

„Realism maintains that universal moral principles cannot be applied to the actions of states in their abstract universal formulation, but that they must be filtered through the concrete circumstances of time and place.“

—  Hans Morgenthau, livro Politics Among Nations

Six Principles of Political Realism, § 4.
Politics Among Nations (1948)
Contexto: Realism maintains that universal moral principles cannot be applied to the actions of states in their abstract universal formulation, but that they must be filtered through the concrete circumstances of time and place. The individual may say for himself: "Fiat justitia, pereat mundus (Let justice be done, even if the world perish)," but the state has no right to say so in the name of those who are in its care. Both individual and state must judge political action by universal moral principles, such as that of liberty. Yet while the individual has a moral right to sacrifice himself in defense of such a moral principle, the state has no right to let its moral disapprobation of the infringement of liberty get in the way of successful political action, itself inspired by the moral principle of national survival.

Ayn Rand photo
Nayef Al-Rodhan photo

„Morality, if present, should not be relied on because it will be trumped by self interest in most circumstances.“

—  Nayef Al-Rodhan philosopher, neuroscientist, geostrategist, and author 1959

Fonte: Emotional amoral egoism (2008), p.204

Ayn Rand photo

„Remember that rights are moral principles which define and protect a man's freedom of action, but impose no obligations on other men.“

—  Ayn Rand Russian-American novelist and philosopher 1905 - 1982

Fonte: The Virtue of Selfishness: A New Concept of Egoism

Bob Dylan photo

„Morality has nothing in common with politics.“

—  Bob Dylan American singer-songwriter, musician, author, and artist 1941

Fonte: Chronicles: Vol. One (2004), p. 45

Martin Luther King, Jr. photo
John T. Noonan Jr. photo
Theodore Parker photo

„Justice is the constitution or fundamental law of the moral universe, the law of right, a rule of conduct for man in all his moral relations.“

—  Theodore Parker abolitionist 1810 - 1860

Ten Sermons of Religion (1853), III : Of Justice and the Conscience https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Ten_Sermons_of_Religion/Of_Justice_and_the_Conscience
Contexto: Justice is the constitution or fundamental law of the moral universe, the law of right, a rule of conduct for man in all his moral relations. Accordingly all human affairs must be subject to that as the law paramount; what is right agrees therewith and stands, what is wrong conflicts and falls. Private cohesions of self-love, of friendship, or of patriotism, must all be subordinate to this universal gravitation towards the eternal right.

Albert Einstein photo

„You are right in speaking of the moral foundations of science, but you cannot turn around and speak of the scientific foundations of morality.“

—  Albert Einstein German-born physicist and founder of the theory of relativity 1879 - 1955

"Physics and Reality" in the Journal of the Franklin Institute Vol. 221, Issue 3 (March 1936), Pages 349-382
1930s
Contexto: It has often been said, and certainly not without justification, that the man of science is a poor philosopher. Why then should it not be the right thing for the physicist to let the philosopher do the philosophizing? Such might indeed be the right thing to do at a time when the physicist believes he has at his disposal a rigid system of fundamental laws which are so well established that waves of doubt can't reach them; but it cannot be right at a time when the very foundations of physics itself have become problematic as they are now. At a time like the present, when experience forces us to seek a newer and more solid foundation, the physicist cannot simply surrender to the philosopher the critical contemplation of theoretical foundations; for he himself knows best and feels more surely where the shoe pinches. In looking for an new foundation, he must try to make clear in his own mind just how far the concepts which he uses are justified, and are necessities.

Frances Wright photo

„An opinion, right or wrong, can never constitute a moral offense, nor be in itself a moral obligation.“

—  Frances Wright American activist 1795 - 1852

A Few Days in Athens (1822) Vol. II
Contexto: An opinion, right or wrong, can never constitute a moral offense, nor be in itself a moral obligation. It may be mistaken; it may involve an absurdity, or a contradiction. It is a truth; or it is an error: it can never be a crime or a virtue.

H.L. Mencken photo

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“