„Note that nobody reads every post in linux-kernel. In fact, nobody who expects to have time left over to actually do any real kernel work will read even half. Except Alan Cox, but he's actually not human, but about a thousand gnomes working in under-ground caves in Swansea. None of the individual gnomes read all the postings either, they just work together really well.“

Post, Linux kernel mailing list, 2000-05-02, Google Groups, Torvalds, Linus, 2006-08-28 https://groups.google.com/d/msg/fa.linux.kernel/iQtWFALi4JA/eSzv64_tOvoJ,
2000s, 2000-04

Última atualização 22 de Maio de 2020. História
Linus Torvalds photo
Linus Torvalds5
programador finlandês 1969

Citações relacionadas

Nathaniel Hawthorne photo
Philip K. Dick photo
Laurence J. Peter photo
Leonardo Da Vinci photo

„Let no man who is not a Mathematician read the elements of my work.“

—  Leonardo Da Vinci Italian Renaissance polymath 1452 - 1519

I Prolegomena and General Introduction to the Book on Painting

Will Rogers photo
Sylvia Plath photo

„So much working, reading, thinking, living to do! A lifetime is not long enough.“

—  Sylvia Plath American poet, novelist and short story writer 1932 - 1963

Fonte: The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

Arno Allan Penzias photo
Philip Pullman photo
Edwin Boring photo
Dorothy L. Sayers photo

„Every time a man expects, as he says, his money to work for him, he is expecting other people to work for him.“

—  Dorothy L. Sayers English crime writer, playwright, essayist and Christian writer 1893 - 1957

Essays, The Other Six Deadly Sins (1941)

Oscar Wilde photo
Georges Simenon photo

„I never read contemporary fiction – with one exception: the works of Simenon concerned with Inspector Maigret.“

—  Georges Simenon Belgian writer 1903 - 1989

T. S. Eliot in the Sunday Times, 1952; cited from David Chinitz T. S. Eliot and the Cultural Divide (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003) p. 56
Criticism

John Steinbeck photo
Daniel Abraham photo

„What I want to do is write something that I could read now (39 years old, married, raising a kid, 10 year IT career behind me, post 9-11, post-Bush, etc.) with the same joy I read the Belgariad when I was 16.“

—  Daniel Abraham speculative fiction writer from the United States 1969

talking about http://asoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/topic/30792-daniel-abraham/page__st__60 his epic fantasy series The Dagger and the Coin
Contexto: For the moment, it's called the Dagger and the Coin, but with any luck, that'll swap out for a better name. There are some things in the proposal that need to get smoothed out so that everyone's on board, but I think it'll happen.
It's a very different from the Long Price books. It looks and feels more like traditional epic fantasy -- quasi-Europe, ferinstance, and some dragons in the background, no 15-year gaps between books -- but the plot structure is packed with everything I think is cool. There are echoes I'm intentionally building in of from things as familiar as Firefly and The Count of Monte Cristo and as obscure as Tevis' Queen's Gambit and Reck-Malleczewen's Diary of a Man in Despair. And the magic system is all about faith and deception, which will be tricky and fun both.
What I want to do is write something that I could read now (39 years old, married, raising a kid, 10 year IT career behind me, post 9-11, post-Bush, etc.) with the same joy I read the Belgariad when I was 16.

Jean Kerr photo

„I will read anything rather than work.“

—  Jean Kerr, livro Please Don't Eat the Daisies

"Introduction"
Please Don't Eat the Daisies (1957)

Anne Morrow Lindbergh photo
Linus Torvalds photo

„Nobody actually creates perfect code the first time around, except me. But there's only one of me.“

—  Linus Torvalds Finnish-American software engineer and hacker 1969

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XpnKHJAok8
Tech Talk: Linus Torvalds on git
YouTube
Google
2007.
2000s, 2007

George Orwell photo

„When one reads any strongly individual piece of writing, one has the impression of seeing a face somewhere behind the page. It is not necessarily the actual face of the writer.“

—  George Orwell English author and journalist 1903 - 1950

"Charles Dickens" (1939)
Contexto: When one reads any strongly individual piece of writing, one has the impression of seeing a face somewhere behind the page. It is not necessarily the actual face of the writer. I feel this very strongly with Swift, with Defoe, with Fielding, Stendhal, Thackeray, Flaubert, though in several cases I do not know what these people looked like and do not want to know. What one sees is the face that the writer ought to have. Well, in the case of Dickens I see a face that is not quite the face of Dickens's photographs, though it resembles it. It is the face of a man of about forty, with a small beard and a high colour. He is laughing, with a touch of anger in his laughter, but no triumph, no malignity. It is the face of a man who is always fighting against something, but who fights in the open and is not frightened, the face of a man who is generously angry — in other words, of a nineteenth-century liberal, a free intelligence, a type hated with equal hatred by all the smelly little orthodoxies which are now contending for our souls.

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“