„Modern science is an extreme step in this development, and in the secularization and sophistication of universe-maintenance.“

—  Peter L. Berger, The Social Construction of Reality, The Social Construction of Reality, 1966, 1999: 130
Publicidade

Citações relacionadas

Francis Escudero photo
Varadaraja V. Raman photo

„Modern science rests on a universality that transcends ethnic, racial, and religious frameworks.“

—  Varadaraja V. Raman American physicist 1932
Truth and Tension in Science and Religion, SOME THOUGHTS ON MULTICULTURALISM

Publicidade
William H. McNeill photo
Alfred North Whitehead photo
Erwin Schrödinger photo
Edmund Husserl photo
Charles Lyell photo

„This doctrine, it is true, had been laid down in terms almost equally explicit by Strabo, to explain the occurrence of fossil shells in the interior of continents, and to that geographer, and other writers of antiquity, Hooke frequently refers; but the revival and development of the system was an important step in the progress of modern science.“

—  Charles Lyell, Principles of Geology
Principles of Geology (1832), Vol. 1, Context: His [Hooke's] principal object was to account for the manner in which shells had been conveyed into the higher parts of 'the Alps, Apennines, and Pyrenean hills, and the interior of continents in general.' These and other appearances, he said, might have been brought about by earthquakes, 'which have turned plains into mountains, and mountains into plains, seas into land, and land into seas, made rivers where there were none before, and swallowed up others that formerly were, &c. &c.; and which, since the creation of the world, have wrought many great changes on the superficial parts of the earth, and have been the instruments of placing shells, bones, plants, fishes, and the like, in those places, where, with much astonishment, we find them.' This doctrine, it is true, had been laid down in terms almost equally explicit by Strabo, to explain the occurrence of fossil shells in the interior of continents, and to that geographer, and other writers of antiquity, Hooke frequently refers; but the revival and development of the system was an important step in the progress of modern science. Chpt.3, p. 38

Leszek Kolakowski photo

„Great art is never extreme. Criticism moves in a false direction, as does art, when it aspires to be a social science... In this world modern artists form a kind of spiritual underground.“

—  Robert Motherwell American artist 1915 - 1991
1940s, Motherwell's writing in 1944; as cited in 'Robert Motherwell, American Painter and Printmaker' https://www.theartstory.org/artist-motherwell-robert-life-and-legacy.htm#writings_and_ideas_header, on 'Artstory'

William Thomson photo

„I need scarcely say that the beginning and maintenance of life on earth is absolutely and infinitely beyond the range of sound speculation in dynamical science.“

—  William Thomson British physicist and engineer 1824 - 1907
As quoted in The Life of Lord Kelvin (1910), by Silvanus Phillips, Volume 2, (2005 edition, . p. 866)

„Does the universe as a whole exhibit any kind of consciousness that we can interact with? Does the universe seek to evolve greater complexity and more sophisticated consciousness?“

—  Peter J. Carroll British occultist 1953
The Apophenion (2008), Context: Does the universe as a whole exhibit any kind of consciousness that we can interact with? Does the universe seek to evolve greater complexity and more sophisticated consciousness? Could it use some help from us in this? Do all species seem worth preserving regardless of their economic value to us? Does some mysterious circularity in time connect consciousness and the very existence of the universe? Most Neo-Pantheists like to think so. p. 62

„We keep, in science, getting a more and more sophisticated view of our essential ignorance.“

—  Warren Weaver American mathematician 1894 - 1978
Context: Is science really gaining in its assault on the totality of the unsolved? As science learns one answer, it is characteristically true that it also learns several new questions. It is as though science were working in a great forest of ignorance, making an ever larger circular clearing within which, not to insist on the pun, things are clear... But as that circle becomes larger and larger, the circumference of contact with ignorance also gets longer and longer. Science learns more and more. But there is an ultimate sense in which it does not gain; for the volume of the appreciated but not understood keeps getting larger. We keep, in science, getting a more and more sophisticated view of our essential ignorance. From: "A Scientist Ponders Faith," Saturday Review, 3 (January 1959), as cited in: F.A. Hayek, ‎Ronald Hamowy. The Constitution of Liberty: The Definitive Edition. 2013, p. 77.

Lesslie Newbigin photo

„Modern science explicitly and emphatically rejects teleology.“

—  Mordechai Ben-Ari Israeli computer scientist 1948
Just a Theory: Exploring the Nature of Science (2005), Chapter 2, “Just a Theory: What Scientists Do” (p. 24)

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“